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Archive for the ‘Photographic Gallery, Black and White’ Category

Paris 1937 by Lucien Aigner. Currently at the Gallery Kayafas, Boston.

By Paul Goldfinger, photography editor @Blogfinger.net

The photojournalist Lucien Aigner was born in Hungary.  He moved to Paris where he worked with some of the pioneer Leica-toting photographers such as Robert Capa. When WWII happened, he escaped to America where he continued his work.  He spend his last days organizing over 100,000 of his negatives.

I have been a Leica photographer most of my life, including now when I work with a Leica digital, the M-9.  But I still spend time scanning negatives for digital files to create prints and to post on Blogfinger.

Josephine Baker was an American singer who moved to France where she was a sensation. She liked to perform in abbreviated costumes including one where she wore a very short skirt made of bananas.  She was famous in Europe, but less so in the US.

Baker was active in the US civil rights movement; she would never perform in front of segregated audiences. During WWII, she assisted the French Resistance, and DeGaulle personally gave her their highest honor.

Her biggest hit was “I Have Two Loves”  (“J’ai deux amours.”)  which we have played on Blogfinger in the past.  (see below)

JOSEPHINE BAKER:

Josephine Baker 1930.

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The archangel Michael slays the devil while a dragon spits water. Paul Goldfinger photo ©.

The Place Saint-Michel dates back to 1860. The fountain is the center-piece, but the open area around it is where people relax, sit, stroll and socialize. It reminds me of the fountain area in Washington Square Park, Greenwich Village, New York.  It is in the Latin Quarter neighborhood on the Left Bank of Paris.

BOB DYLAN  “These Foolish Things” from his new album Triplicate

Paris is a walking city.  The cafés, parks, fountains, churches, bridges across the Seine, meals in bistros, strolls around town such as in the Isle de la Cité or around Notre Dame—all of it lends itself to romantic moments. The city especially shines at night—it is the City of Lights.  And those moments, as brief or as foolish as they might be, create lasting memories.  The Place de Saint Michel (above) is like that if you just hang around for even 15 minutes.

 

 

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Paris. By Paul Goldfinger © Click left for full view

Paris. By Paul Goldfinger © Click  for full view   (re-posted from 2013)

CHARLES TRENET.  “La Romance de Paris.”

 

 

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NYC blizzard 1969. Central Park. By Paul Goldfinger © Blogfinger.net

 

PUPPINI SISTERS:

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Italy. By Paul Goldfinger ©

Italy. By Paul Goldfinger ©

PUCCINI:   From Madame Butterly  “One Fine Day”

 

 

 

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A bus in Italy gets your attention. By Paul Goldfinger. © Undated.  Tom Costantino wins the title contest.

JESSICA MOLASKEY

 

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Lovely to look at, delightful to know, kinky perhaps.      Paul Goldfinger portrait. © 2014.

 

MAX RAABE AND CHRISTOPH ISRAEL

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By Paul Goldfinger, Editor  @Blogfinger   (Reposted from September, 2011 on Blogfinger)  I like this post, so here it is again; the third time around since 2011.  Read the comments.

It was 1991, and we were visiting Paris with our son Michael, who had just turned 21. We had been there before and we liked the Left Bank the best, especially the area near the oldest church in town  (St. Germaine des Pres)  located on the Boulevard St. Germaine. You can walk that neighborhood and find bookstalls along the River Seine, Musee D’Orsay—home of the Impressionists, funky neighborhoods near the Sorbonne, antique shops, bistros where you can’t get a bad meal, small hotels with floor to ceiling windows and no elevators, and wonderful food markets.

Boats moored along the Seine. Paul Goldfinger photo ©

Boats moored along the Seine. Paul Goldfinger photo ©

Behind the old church, where the Blvd. St. Germaine meets Rue de Rennes, is a tiny park where you can relax, called the Rue de l’Abbaye—a respite from the bustle all around it.  But also at that intersection is the famous Café Les Deux Magots where Hemingway, Picasso and other artists and intellectuals used to hang out. It’s so much fun to sip an espresso there and people-watch.

Park adjacent to the church: St. Germaine des Pres. Paul Goldfinger photo ©. 1991.

One evening Michael and I took a walk.  At the corner, in front of the church and across from the café, we heard a street band playing. They were called “The Lost Wandering Blues and Jazz Band”, composed mostly of American musicians.  But we were most intriqued by their vocalist, a seventeen year old young woman from New York and California who sounded like Billie Holiday. She had been living in Paris since she moved there at age 16 with her mom.  Madeleine Peyroux is now a jazz star who performs around the world, but we think of her standing on the sidewalk with a floppy hat on, charming the crowd.

As you can imagine, I took a lot of photographs there. Below is the Cafe Deux Magots which dates back to 1875—just a few years younger than Ocean Grove.

And below that is Madeleine Peyroux singing in French. The song is “J’ai Deux Amours”  (I have two loves).  It is from her album “Careless Love.”    That’s a good song for an album with that name.

Cafe Deux Magots. Paris. 1991. By Paul Goldfinger

Presenting Madeleine Peyroux:

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Montecatini, Tuscany, Italy.  Paul Goldfinger photo. Digital “print” from a medium format negative.  ©

 

The sculpture pays homage to the wild boar which is the favorite prey of hunters in Tuscany.  They go out on hunts with their dogs. In some parts of Italy, the wild boar go tearing through the vineyards causing damage.  After the hunt the town’s families get together to drink the local wine such as Chianti or Brunello.  The boar meat is slow cooked for stew or for pasta with boar sauce containing morsels of tender meat.

IL VOLO   “Mattinata”   (live)

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Tanglewood

Tanglewood Music School and Festival in the Berkshires  (Massachusetts.)  By Paul Goldfinger ©  Click to tell the black keys from the white. Digital print from a film negative.

LUCIA MICARELLI (violin)   with MICHIEL HUISMAN   from the HBO series “Tremé”

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