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By Paul Goldfinger, 2013 ©

By Paul Goldfinger, 2013 ©

BUDDY HOLLY:

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Stuffed Flounder With Shrimp

Eileen Goldfinger, Food and Garden Editor  @Blogfinger

Fish:

2 flounder fillets

1/4 teaspoon chili powder

1 tablespoon Smart Balance  margarine

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil

1/2 lemon

Stuffing:

6 medium shrimp, diced and peeled

1 scallion, diced

1 shallot, minced

1 small celery stalk, diced

1/2 teaspoon ground garlic

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

pinch of salt

4 tablespoons Eggbeaters

1/4 cup Panko bread crumbs

Prepare the stuffing:

Put the margarine and the oil in a 10 inch non-stick pan and heat on medium.

Add shrimp, scallion, shallot, celery, garlic, black pepper and salt.

Sauté until scallions soften, and shrimp turn pink, approximately  5 minutes.

Remove from pan and place in a bowl to cool.  Turn off heat under pan.

When the stuffing is cool, add Eggbeaters and Panko bread crumbs to the mix.

Prepare the fish:

Re-heat the pan on medium and add a little more oil if  necessary.

Rub the chili powder on both sides of the fillets. Lay the fillets, skin side down on the counter (the skins are removed), place half of the stuffing in each fillet. Pull the two ends of the fillet together, over the stuffing, and secure with a wooden toothpick.

Cook the fillets in the pan until they turn brown and then turn them over and brown the other side. While they are cooking, squeeze the juice from the lemon over them.

serves 2

Cookin’ Music:   Clifford Curry with “Mamma’s Home Cookin'”

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Crew-members: Doolittle raid on Japanese islands, April 18, 1942. 16 B-25B bombers took off from the deck of the USS Hornet.

By Kennedy Buckley of Ocean Grove, New Jersey   (Re-posted from 2012 on Blogfinger.)

I was 9, visiting Ireland, when the war started in 1939. To get home we embarked from Scotland, and Mom bought me some toy soldiers and a tank for the sea voyage home.

The bombing of Pearl Harbor was what changed life in the US; now we were in the war instead of watching. Lots of small banners with a blue star in the center started appearing in front windows, meaning a family member was in the service. My two older cousins from Philly went in, and  one would become an officer in the paratroopers (more about him later). Dad’s younger brother with no children was drafted — my dad not. Soon there were multiple flags in many windows.

Nobody was allowed to go up on the roof of my uncle’s tall apartment building in Brooklyn because a spy could see all the ships in New York harbor awaiting convoy. All  windows had to have heavy  drapes to prevent light shining out. If light could be seen, an Air Raid Warden blew a whistle until you fixed it. Rationing books were needed to buy food and things. Tin cans and tin foil were saved and collected for the “war effort.”

There was little car driving (gas and tires were rationed) so Esso (now Exxon) printed war maps instead of road maps on which you could follow the battle front as the Allies went through Europe and the Pacific. War news was really bad, defeat after defeat; however, our spirits were raised with very welcome GOOD news about a daring air raid on Tokyo by B-25 bombers flying off aircraft carriers. (The 70th anniversary of that raid just passed–in 2012.)

This family had 3 members serving. The service flag hung in many windows.

As the war went on, many of the BLUE stars in the windows started changing to GOLD, signifying the death of that serviceman.

Many of our neighbors in the tenements were Italian. Each family had a small storage room in the cellars. Italian families made wine there and stored it in big bottles. When V-E Day came, the celebrating started in the afternoon by bringing the wine to the street for huge block parties that went on into the wee hours. EVERYBODY drank. I was 14 and my buddies and I got falling drunk for the first time, rolling around in the street — nobody cared.

Newsreels of color war footage of the island by island battles in the Pacific were shown in the movie theaters. They were so gruesome that when the atomic bombs were dropped, nobody complained — soon after came V-J Day.  It was the end ….of that war.

4 brothers from the Demby family of Bayonne, NJ (Paul’s family) returned home after serving in WWII. Three were in the Pacific, and one (Marty) was in the convoys that plowed through the North Atlantic with supplies for Russia and England. PG family photo. 1945.  Front l to r.  Ben (Bronze star valor), “Duke” (subs), rear: Al on left (Sea Bees) and Marty  (Coast Guard).

 

Postscript by Ken:

The soldiers came back home in droves to try to begin a normal life. My cousin Jimmy, the paratrooper, was already back recuperating  in an Army Hospital. He had jumped twice in Europe, D-Day in France and later in Belgium. He lost most of his men in the 2nd jump and was badly wounded. He never really resumed a normal life. He married (I was in the Wedding Party) a wonderful, beautiful woman,  an ex-Rockette. He was in and out of Veterans hospitals until he died in his early 30’s.

I fear for the returning veterans from our recent and current wars. Will they get enough care? I really worry.

Kennedy Buckley   (Note:  Ken Buckley died earlier this year in Ocean Grove.)

 

MUSIC from that era:  A lot of the music was sentimental and often catered to the imaginations of homesick GI’s who literally spent years away from home and loved ones.

Here is Peggy Lee with the Benny Goodman orchestra with a song that undoubtedly reminded many GI’s of their girls back home.  —PG

 

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Mulberry Street, near Chinatown. By Paul Goldfinger © Sept 2013.

Mulberry Street, near Chinatown. By Paul Goldfinger © Sept 2013.  Click to enlarge.

Little Italy has been fading away for years. Yet you can still take a food tour there and visit family businesses that exist after more than one hundred years.

On Columbus Day,  the Italian-American community is celebrated —-Paul Goldfinger, Editor @Blogfinger.

 

SALISBURY CATHEDRAL BOYS AND GIRLS CHOIR   “The Lord is my Shepherd”

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8:30 am. Vicky Redfern of Harrisburg, Pa. surveys the empty Ocean Grove beach.

8:30 am. Vicky Redfern of Harrisburg, Pa. surveys the empty Ocean Grove beach.   Click images to enlarge. Re-post from the autumn of 2013.

Bikers whiz by an empty Ocean Pathway Paul Goldfinger photo Sept 4 8:30 am ©

Bikers whiz by an empty Ocean Pathway
Paul Goldfinger photo Sept 4, 2013,  8:30 am ©

 

By Paul Goldfinger,  Editor @Blogfinger.net

 

On a beautiful September 4 morning, there were just a few scattered walkers, joggers, bikers and dogs tugging on leashes.   The beach was totally empty.  Lifeguard stands were standing together in a bunch.

Vicky Redfern is in town to sign papers for her new OG year-round home.  She was wondering if there is anything to do here in the winter.  Anybody want to comment on that?     There are 12 comments below which are of interest.

My suggestion would be to take tango lessons.  Here’s Gato Barbieri from “The Last Tango in Paris:”

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Saturday night. Ocean Grove, NJ By Paul Goldfinger

SOUNDTRACK.  Joe Venuti. This song is usually done with a trumpet lead—Louis A. mostly.  But Joe Venuti is something else altogether.  He uses a violin for the lead, with the trumpet coming in later. His voice sounds like a combo of two Louis—Prima and Armstrong.  PG

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To my dear sister with all my love—Adelaide

By Eileen and Paul Goldfinger  (Re-post from 2012, but timeless.)

We found this photograph at the Ocean Grove flea market, some years ago. At first, we were drawn to it because it was in a beautiful blue glass frame.

But then we noticed  the lovely portrait of an elegant woman who seemed mysterious.  The hairdo  is probably from the twenties or thirties and is likely an example of a “finger wave.”  She’s wearing lipstick and she probably has makeup on.  Her expression is blank except for the slightest suggestion of a smile.  It looks like she is wearing a coat or jacket with a fur collar. The material is shimmery.  What is it?

There was no date, but there was a little dedication at the bottom. It says, “To my dear sister with all my love—Adelaide.”

The inscription is written in a delicate ornate and crystal-clear style. She separates a few letters with tiny spaces between–sort of a combination of cursive and printing.  People don’t write on photographs anymore, and, in fact, they often take their own digital photos and then leave them in their cameras or on their computers, never to be printed or shared, except in the form of digital images on phones, iPads, or Facebook pages. No one can actually touch such a picture.

But Adelaide had her portrait done by a professional photographic artist. She probably was very particular in her selection.  Every town back-when had a photo studio.  Remember the work of Disfarmer which we presented on this blog?   Blogfinger article about Disfarmer, portrait artist.

An actual photograph, made on film and printed on paper by an expert, as in this case, is an object of beauty that transcends the actual subject matter. Some photographers today are learning old black and white methods such as platinum or albumin printing or silver printing in a darkroom with special papers  in order to capture those wonderful textures, tints and gradations of grey seen in photographs like this one.

The name Adelaide is from the Germanic and means “noble kind.”  It was popular early in the 20th century, but by 1950, girl babies were no longer given that name.  But then, as if rising from the dead, the name has regained popularity starting in 2005.  Now it is said to be quite popular.

On the Broadway stage (1950,) there is a character named Miss Adelaide in “Guys and Dolls.” She is a nightclub performer who is Nathan Detroit’s girlfriend.

If we try to dig down into the inscription at the bottom of the photograph, we sense a deep expression  of loss or distance between the writer and her sister. There is a sadness there, compounded by the fact that this image wound up for sale to a stranger at a flea market.   “To my dear sister with all my love–Adelaide”  seems so heartfelt, as if it is more than a sister would say to another.  We’ll never know what was behind that emotional inscription.    But the song captures the sense of it all.

Renee Fleming, the opera star, often steps over the line to perform music in other genres.  This was recorded by her for the soundtrack of The Shape of Water which won the Oscar in 2018 for Alexandre Desplat.

“You’ll Never Know” was written for a 1943 movie called Hello, Frisco, Hello.  The song is based on a poem written by a young Oklahoma war bride named Dorothy Fern Norris.  In 1943 it won the Oscar for Best Original song, one of nine nominated that year.  Harry Warren and Mack Gordon were the composers.

 

 

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“Easiest Game on the Boardwalk.” Seaside Heights, New Jersey. Paul Goldfinger

I grew up in Bergen County. When we were in high school, we went to Seaside Heights in the summer. We were focused on the girls.

If this were a weather report, we would describe an erogenous zone coming in from the north. We were too young to drink, so we would stand outside the Chatterbox on the boardwalk and hope for the best.

If we did meet some girls, we often thought of them metaphorically in terms of dessert. Take this song for example—by John Pizzarelli, a Jersey Boy, a performer who always has a gleam in his eye:         —PG

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“Michael” by Paul Goldfinger. ©   This image appeared in a national magazine, “Hospital Physician.” It was taken in Mt. Sinai Hospital, NYC.

 

ALISON BALSOM  (oboe.)    Scottish Ensemble:   “Oboe Concerto in C Minor: II. Adagio”  Composed by Alessandro Marcello  (1673-1747)  Venice.

 

 

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New Jersey Ave bridge seen from the OG side. April, 2013. PG photo

New Jersey Ave bridge seen from the OG side. April, 2013. PG photo. Left click for full view.

By Paul Goldfinger, Editor  @Blogfinger.  This 2013 piece brought 50 comments. It is worth re-reading.

Every night at midnight, the NTPD locks the gates on the OG side of those two bridges.  At 5:00 a.m. the gates are opened.  This policy has been in effect since 1995 and was initiated by Neptune Township as a method to stop high crime rates on the bridge and on both sides of the bridge. Many of those crimes were happening in the late evening and early morning hours.  The police tried foot patrols, a police substation by the bridge, covert ops and decoys, but despite some arrests, the problems continued.

The top priority for the NTPD was to do the right thing from a public safety perspective.  Soon after the gates/locks idea was implemented, there was, according to NTPD Chief Robert Adams,  a “dramatic impact” on crime in that location, on both sides of the bridges.

The Lock

The Lock

In 1995 some individuals complained about the idea*, especially from the AP side, who viewed the locks as keeping Asbury Park citizens out.   Others said that the purpose of the gates was to prevent criminals from quickly escaping the Grove, but Chief Adams says that cutting off escapes was not the main mechanism.   Instead the benefit came mostly from reducing the number of criminals hanging around in those locations, something that would help both communities.   In recent years, the police have received no complaints about the bridge closures.

Chief Adams says that his department is “constantly re-evaluating”  all its policies .  However, at this time, he believes that the vast number of Grovers support the continued implementation of the bridge closures and he continues to place “public safety” as the main focus for police work in Neptune Township and, specifically, in Ocean Grove.

* Philadelphia Inquirer, Nov 12, 1995  link)  From Jamie of Ocean Grove:      1995 newspaper article link

Editor’s Note:  If you wish to comment on this topic, please tell us which side of the lake you live on.  I think your comments will have more credibility if you do, especially if you say your name, but neither is required.  —Paul

GRASCALS

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