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—Paul Goldfinger, Editor, Blogfinger.net

Some songs really need to be performed with a vocalist because the lyrics are so beautiful.  And that is true for the jazz classic “All the Things You Are.”  It was written in 1939 for a show called “Very Warm for May.”

Jerome Kern wrote the music while Oscar Hammerstein II wrote the words. These two musical geniuses collaborated for many great songs.  Here are some of the lyrics from the verse, so you can see how remarkable the words are:

 

“You are the promised kiss of springtime
That makes the lonely winter seem long
You are the breathless hush of evening
That trembles on the brink of a lovely song
You are the angel glow that lights a star
The dearest things I know are what you are
Some day my happy arms will hold you
And some day I’ll know that moment divine
When all the things you are, are mine”

 

But the music is so gorgeous on its own, that in the hands of a great jazz musician you can get this–

 

Ken.  Peplowski and friends:

 

 

BONUS TRACK:  This time with the words.  Carly Simon from her 22nd album “‘Moonlight Serenade.”  (2005)

 

 

Carly Simon

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Organ curator, John Shaw preparing the new harmonic flute pipes for installation at the Great Auditorium. Photo by Mary Walton

 

By Mary Walton, Blogfinger staff.  2012.

     Back in the 1960s, in what organist Gordon Turk deplores as “an unfortunate attempt to modernize” the magnificent organ in the Great Auditorium, 44 large open wood pipes were removed, cut up and used for wind ducts.
     Their absence robbed the organ of its heft and rich, deep-throated tone. The person responsible “claimed to be an organ specialist but really should have been a plumber,” said Ocean Grove’s organ curator, John Shaw.
     But when Turk puts the pedal to the metal for the opening concert of the 2012 summer season at noon Saturday, the Auditorium will once again fill with the sound that organ designer and builder Robert Hope-Jones intended listeners to hear.
     Earlier this month replacement pipes made of poplar, constructed by A.R. Schopp’s Sons of Ohio and ranging in size from four to sixteen feet, were shoehorned into the tight quarters behind the choir loft by a team of Philadelphia riggers. To gain access, a wall to the building superintendent’s office had to be removed and then replaced.
     There’s more. For some years Turk had longed for a set of harmonic flute pipes such as those found in the organs of certain French cathedrals. The Ocean Grove organ has many flute pipes, but harmonic flute pipes are distinguished by a small hole which reinforces certain overtones, giving them a clear “ringing” quality.
     Until recently Turk believed they would render superlative sound only if  housed in stone cathedrals. That is, until he played the organs at halls in Zurich and Vienna with acoustics similar to the wood-lined Great Auditorium. Could such pipes be installed here?
     Turk consulted, among others, Jean-Louis Coignet, the organ curator of the City of Paris, who had once visited Ocean Grove and pronounced the auditorium’s organ “magnifique.” Over the winter they worked via e-mail to establish specifications for 306 harmonic flute pipes ranging in size from one and three-fifths to eight feet, divided into five “ranks” played from the organ’s five keyboards. John Shaw installed them just this week.
     The two installations bring the organ’s total pipe count to 11,558.
     The cost of the additional pipes is $65,000, made possible by gifts from two donors, James G. Howes of Clearwater, Florida, a transportation consultant, and Dr. Liselotte Schmidt, a retired music professor who lives in Newtown Square, Pennsylvania.

 

Howes, the grandson of  Methodist minister G.E. Lowman, a noted Baltimore radio evangelist, contributed $45,000 for the construction and installation of the open wood pipes in memory of his grandfather.  “I thought this would be a wonderful way to memorialize my grandfather and make a contribution to Ocean Grove that everyone could enjoy,” he said in an interview.

     Howes learned to play the organ in his grandfather’s church, the Baltimore Gospel Tabernacle, now an historic landmark. “I’m just good enough,” he said, “to know how much more I need to know.” He has also played and sung in the choir of the interdenominational Riverside Church in New York City.
     Howes’ grandparents were frequent visitors to Ocean Grove, as was his mother. Howes himself has been coming here since childhood and never misses a Choir Festival. A pilot who forged a career in airport management, Howes is also the president of Atlas Communications, which offers a weekly radio program, Sacred Classics, and produces CDs and concerts.
One CD recorded in 2001 features Gordon Turk. Titled “Sacred Classics at Ocean Grove,” it has sold more than 3,000 copies, which Howes says is “very good for an organ record.”
     He will be in the audience Saturday when Gordon Turk will debut the organ’s new additions.
     Turk will also offer a July 4 recital (“Storms &Thunder, Stripes & Pipes”) and will play at a July 5 Summer Stars performance with the Philos Polished Brass Ensemble. And featuring, of course, the Auditorium organ.

One of the new 16-foot open wood pipes under construction earlier this year in Ohio


Editor’s note.   September, 07, 2022.
  Below is a comment from OG historian David Fox dated today.

 

The Auditorium organ was purchased at a supposed discount in return for having, “Hope-Jones Organ Co. Elmira, N. Y.” emblazoned in gold on the base of the central display pipes. This ceased to appear on postcards in the 1920s.

While the company went out of business in 1910 and the present instrument is mostly not Hope-Jones, I feel it would be a nice historical touch if the name were restored.

It also had some now vanished “U”-shaped wooden ornaments running along the slanting tops of the pipe screens.

 

CANTILENE.      This is a Gordon Turk recording on the Ocean Grove organ.

 

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“September Tents.” By Paul Goldfinger

 

JUDY KUHN.   “Time After Time”.  written in 1946 for a Sinatra movie. It Happened in Brooklyn.

 

 

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Live nativity procession. Ocean Grove, New Jersey. c. 2000. By Paul Goldfinger. Copyright

Live nativity procession. Ocean Grove, New Jersey. c. 2000. By Paul Goldfinger. ©.  This event used to be held outdoors with a finish in the Auditorium Pavilion. Now it is held in the Great Auditorium.  The music is too happy to remain only in December.

 

By Paul Goldfinger, MD, Editor @Blogfinger.net

 

When we first moved here part-time in 1998, we became acquainted with the Live Nativity event.  I never saw anything like it before.

I recall standing out in the cold waiting for the children and animals to appear.  There was a procession, and  this star bearer came by. She seemed as  if  she had appeared out of the mists of time  as in Brigadoon.   For a moment I felt I had experienced time travel.

Preserving the past is usually expressed in this town by the architecture. But other things occur which add life to the history, as you see in the photograph.

It’s important to continue those traditions whenever possible.   The live nativity is now indoors, but it seemed more authentic when we were breathing vapor out our nostrils while waiting in the cold for the two-humped camel, the wise men, the sheep and some shepherds to arrive.

 

SOUNDTRACK:  As a teenage musician I often took part in Christmas celebrations and concerts. We went caroling in the snow , and people tossed dollar bills out the windows of the garden apartments where we lived.

In school, Christmas music was a big deal, and I always have associated this holiday with beautiful music,  both classical and popular.

But this photograph seems to require something especially heart-felt and different from the usual carols, so here, although it is not actually a Christmas selection, it does seem to go with the photo.  It’s Puccini.—Paul Goldfinger

 

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"No Turns." NYC Street Series: By Paul Goldfinger/ Copyright

“No Turns.” NYC Street Series: By Paul Goldfinger.  Click photo for full view.  ©

SHIRLEY BASSEY with a New, York, New York medley:

 

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Josh Pomponio (L) Wm. Paterson U.; Katherine Picariello NYU; Marlee Roberts NYU; Scott Schuyler NYU; Stephanie Wong Rutgers; George Itzhak NYU (missing: Lindsay Rassmann Montclair State; Charlie Redd NYU)
Josh Pomponio (L) Wm. Paterson U.; Katherine Picariello, NYU; Marlee Roberts, NYU; Scott Schuler, NYU; Stephanie Wong, Rutgers; George Itzhak, NYU (missing from the photo: Lindsay Rassmann, Montclair State; Charlie Redd, NYU, Nicole Rosen, Drexel U.)   click left for full view.  Paul Goldfinger photo ©

 

“This is wonderful,” said BFFF producer Marlee Roberts.   She was speaking for the nine university film makers who showed their creations in the Youth Temple at Ocean Grove today.

A scene from Katherine Picariello's film A scene from Katherine Picariello’s film “Tracing.” Photo by Eileen Goldfinger

 

Seven of the directors from 5 different schools were thrilled to see their work projected on a big screen with professional quality audio and video provided by the Camp Meeting Association staff.  They also were delighted to be in Ocean Grove at such a beautiful venue and they were grateful to have an audience with whom they could share their work.

Paul introduces the program. The NYU hat is to honor film makers from that school who made movies in the Grove: Woody Allen and Marlee Roberts

Paul introduces the program. The NYU hat is to honor film makers from that school who made movies in the Grove: Woody Allen, David Chase, and Marlee Roberts. Eileen Goldfinger photo

The Festival began with a music and slide show featuring images of Ocean Grove by Paul Goldfinger.

Paul and Marlee introduced the program, and then the films were screened in succession.  The material was quite varied including two documentaries, a fantasy featuring a ballet sequence,  a French style film noir,  a couple of dramatic sequences,  a study of the effects of bulimia, and  a comedy about getting into the heaven of your choice.

Afterward a Q & A revealed some insights into the inspirations influencing these young film makers as well some practical revelations about how a film school degree can lead to a job in the movie industry after graduation. One insight that they shared had to do with how many people are required to produce a short film and how these students collaborate with each other and tap into each other’s talents to complete their projects.

We would like to thank the Ocean Grove Camp Meeting Association, OGCMA staff members Chris Flynn and Shelley Belusar, assistant producer Eileen Goldfinger, our tireless creative producer Marlee Roberts, Mayor Eric Houghtaling, and Mr. Richard Lepore of the OG Chamber of  Commerce.

We also want to acknowledge our sponsors, the OG Chamber of Commerce, KFR Communications   (Andrew Gioulis), Barbaric Bean, Smugglers’ Cove, OG Flower and Gift Shop, Drs. Whilden and Brevit (painless dentists) and Cruisin’ Limo Service of Ocean Grove  (Florence and Mark Meier.)

Also thanks to the CMA volunteers who helped at the event.  Thanks finally to our audience who attended and helped  in our effort to raise some money for the OG boardwalk reconstruction.

Lastly  (but not leastly)  we want to acclaim and thank our talented filmmakers who took part in today’s festival.  We will miss you. Come back soon and bring some more great films with you.

—–Paul Goldfinger , editor @Blogfinger

 

From “The Aviator”  Loudon Wainwright III:  “After You’ve Gone.”

 

April 2022.    I’m sorry that I don’t have any followup regarding what happened to these fledgling film makers. Perhaps some Grovers will get together to resurrect this idea in the future; it was a wonderful small town event—the sort of idea that is perfect for the Grove as it moves to a better cultural/secular future to balance the religious life here.

And, you should know that the main reason we did not pursue a “Third Annual”  was the insistence on the part of the CMA that they approve every film in advance.   We reluctantly went along, and Marlee Roberts and her colleagues were beautiful in making that work, but I would never again subject young creative people to censorship.

PG

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This photograph is the first in Ted Bell's Images of America: Ocean Grove.

This photograph  (with permission)  is the first in Ted Bell’s ” Images of America: Ocean Grove.”  CLICK TO ENLARGE

 

BLOGFINGER RE-RUN FROM 2010.  It’s important that more people other than tourists learn OG history.  This timeline gives some perspective for new Grovers and others who ought to educate themselves to this sequence of events. Thus we periodically re-post this timeline.

By Paul Goldfinger, MD, Editor @Blogfinger.net.

 

Ocean Grove’s history is a fascinating saga about how a Methodist summer community founded in 1869 eventually evolved into a historic and diverse year-round tourist town while preserving its religious and architectural characteristics.

Sure it’s about the Camp Meeting Association (CMA), the Great Auditorium, the tents, and the famous religious figures who took center stage since the founding, but there is so much more to tell,  particularly about the town’s secular history including:  its governance; the multiple attempts to secede from Neptune;  the successful but temporary creation of  an independent secular Borough of Ocean Grove in 1920; opening of the gates in 1979; loss of governance by the CMA in 1980; the decline of the “blue laws”;  the extraordinary  successes of the Ocean Grove Homeowner’s Association as they transform OG from shabbiness to renaissance by the 1990’s; the remarkable demographic changes of the 1990’s including the growth of the gay community,  the amazing musical heritage, the fights over taxes, and there is so much more.

The Historical Society of Ocean Grove has offered wonderful exhibits about such topics as the women’s suffrage movement and the African-American “history trail” here, and we at Blogfinger  have run two pieces about John Phillip Sousa in Ocean Grove as well as the account of Paul Robeson’s 1925 concert in the Great Auditorium.

We plan to continue our series of articles on some of the less well known accounts in Ocean Grove’s history, especially focusing on secular events. We will begin the process of digging into Ocean Grove’s fascinating past with a time-line. It’s important for Grovers to know this history.  You may be surprised by some of the items below:

1869: Ocean Grove is founded by the Rev. William Osborne and his colleagues. They form the Ocean Grove Camp Meeting Association of the Methodist Episcopal Church (CMA) and begin purchasing land. The town is part of Ocean Township. The CMA’s goal is to provide and maintain a Christian seaside resort.

1870: The New Jersey Legislature grants a charter to CMA which allows them to govern in Ocean Grove. They can make ordinances, establish a police department and a court of law, and administer all infrastructure and services including schools, sanitation and library.

The town is designed “from scratch,” becoming one of the first planned communities in the US. The first lots are “sold” (i.e. leased) from the CMA which retains ownership of all the land. The first cottage is built in 1870.

1872:  Over 300 cottages have been built.

1875: Rev Adam Wallace founds the Ocean Grove Record, the town’s first newspaper. Rev. E. H. Stokes, the first CMA President says, regarding the gate closure on Sunday, that “there is no human probability that these rules will ever be revoked.” The first train from New York arrives in OG. People begin to stay year round.

1879:  The NJ Legislature creates Neptune Township by carving it out of Ocean Township and incorporates Ocean Grove’s boundaries as part of Neptune. Ocean Grove CMA and lot/home owners pay taxes to Neptune. Leaseholders (“lessees”) must continue to pay “ground rent” to the CMA.

The CMA refuses all services from Neptune and continues to function as the “governing authority,” maintaining rigid control in OG.   Physical isolation within its boundaries, “blue laws,” land ownership, and a homogeneous population of Methodists contribute to the sustained CMA rule.  Ocean Grove is, in practice, a theocracy. But that will become a problem for them over 100 years later.

1897: The first mention of tax discontentment appears as CMA President Bishop Fitzgerald speaks publicly about Neptune’s tax bill and says, “Of the discrimination against us in the matter of taxation does not as yet seem to admit of remedy.”

1898:  Ocean Grove’s “lessees,” who pay property  taxes to Neptune Township, want the CMA to pay the land taxes to Neptune. A suit is brought by the homeowners, but in 1900 the NJ Supreme Court sides with the CMA.

1912: Ocean Grove’s citizens want to participate in the town’s governance, so they elect a Board of Representative Lessees to join with the CMA in managing the town’s affairs.  There was unrest, with many citizens disliking this peculiar arrangement and wanting Ocean Grove to be a regular town with an elected secular government.

1915: the Ocean Grove Taxpayers and Protective League is formed.

1918: CMA has financial problems and asks Neptune to take over police, garbage and sanitation functions. Neptune refuses.

1920. The Lessee Board is dissolved, and the Civic Betterment League is formed. Its goal is the creation of an independent Ocean Grove Borough.  The CMA supports the idea, and the NJ Legislature passes an Ocean Grove Borough bill which creates an incorporated borough, apart from Neptune.  Governor Edwards signs it into law, a referendum in town receives wide support, and local elections are held.

The new Borough of Ocean Grove operates for one year, but they retain the CMA “blue laws”. Opponents in town want things the old way and they form the “Lessees Association” They sue in State Supreme Court.

1921: The NJ Court of Errors and Appeals finds the Borough bill to be unconstitutional, because the Borough has allowed religious ordinances to stand. The Borough bill might have been upheld if the “blue laws” were discarded, but the CMA and its supporters refuse. The Borough is dissolved, and governance goes back to Neptune and the CMA. This was not the first attempt to gain secular control of OG, but this one came the closest.

1923: A bill to make Ocean Grove a separate tax district with its own tax rates gets “lost in the legislature.”

1924:  A big battle ensues as Neptune tries to substantially increase the CMA’s taxes, including high taxes on the beach, Auditorium, streets, sewers, etc. CMA wins in 1925 at the NJ Tax Board, and most of their holdings are not taxed.

1925-1960:  The town is a popular summer resort and is known internationally.  Huge crowds visit along with US Presidents and many celebrities. As for the ongoing arguments in Ocean Grove, the historian Gibbon says, in 1939, “Many times residents and land lessees of the town have voiced their objection to the local rules, to the tax situation or to the form of government, especially from 1900-1925, and there have been many court fights.”

For the most part, things stay the same.

1960-1980: Ocean Grove declines, along with much of the Jersey shore. (See below)

1975:   A group of dedicated citizens led by Mr. Ted Bell and his colleagues obtain approval for OG’s designation as a State and National historic district. It is a complicated process.  Formation of Board of Architectural Review (BAR) happens in 1984.  (Later re-named the Historic Preservation Commission—HPC.)

1975:  A newspaper service sues over Sunday’s gate closures, which had been permitted by town ordinance.  The NJ Supreme Court strikes down the ordinance on grounds that it violates the first amendment to the Constitution (freedom of the press). The gates are opened for the news service only, but the CMA is allowed to continue its theocratic governance of Ocean Grove and the enforcement of other “blue laws”. Many people in Ocean Grove view the gates’ opening as an unhappy event.

1977:  A lawsuit stemming from a drunk-driving conviction challenges the authority of Ocean Grove’s municipal court. The NJ Supreme Court widens the scope of the case and decides in June, 1979 that CMA governance in Ocean Grove is in violation of the Constitutional separation of church and state. Appeals are filed. This marks the beginning of the end for CMA governance in OG.

1980: The US Supreme Court would not hear the appeal, so governance of OG is transferred from the CMA to Neptune Township. Neptune eventually eliminates most of the blue laws. Only the Sunday morning beach closure and the ban on alcohol sales remain.

1980’s:   By the 1980’s, the town is characterized by an overall “decrepitude,” including deterioration of buildings, declining tourism, crime, and a growing poor elderly population. (2)  Deinstitutionalized mental patients are housed in empty old hotels and rooming houses in Ocean Grove. The town becomes a “psychiatric ghetto” (NY Times, October 1988), and, by the 1980’s, 10% of the town’s population are mental cases who are not receiving appropriate services and are sometimes abused by landlords. The prognosis for Ocean Grove is dire.

During this period, the Ocean Grove Homeowner’s Association (OGHOA) develops as a political and activist force that successfully begins the process of converting the town from decay to renaissance. (2f)

1990’s:  OGHOA, led by Mr. Herb Herbst, Fran Paladino and others, fight for fair treatment in the allotment of the mentally ill around the state. The group’s political contacts and influence are considerable. The process is complex and difficult, but the numbers of “de-institutionalized” in OG drops considerably.

The group also saw to the closing of many substandard boarding and rooming houses. The HOA presents Neptune with a “master plan” to protect the historic nature of OG and to rezone for the promotion of single family houses. OGHOA promotes secular tourism while working with CMA to increase religious tourism.  New people come into town to buy homes and invest in businesses.

1995:

The historic Neptune High School is saved from becoming low income housing by a group of Ocean Grove homeowners led by Mr. Herb Herbst and with the assistance of State Senator Joseph Palaia and others. (3, 4)  The Jersey Shore Arts Center is owned and run today by a nonprofit tax exempt organization: The Ocean Grove Historic Preservation Society.

2000:  Secular goals achieved as of 2000: increased property values, increased upgrading of houses, improved relations with Neptune, improved downtown with quaint shops, art galleries, cafes, etc., reduced crime, increased tourism, reduced de-institutionalized patients, demographic changes (increased gays, empty nesters, retirees,  professionals, academics, young artists, and middle class families).

2005: House prices peak.

2007:  New topics emerge:  North End development, Ocean Pavilion dispute (gays vs. CMA), evolving demographics including more second home purchases, significant increases in property taxes, parking problems, Asbury Park development stalls, and home prices decline.

2009:  Ocean Grove blog is founded  (Blogfinger.net) by Paul Goldfinger, MD to help fill in the gap created when the OG newspaper closed. It offered a place to voice opinions about Ocean Grove’s many ongoing issues.

October 29, 2012.  super-storm Sandy hits the Jersey Shore and destroys the Ocean Grove beachfront, part of the Great Auditorium roof, and floods the south side of town.

 

2009-2022:  Blogfinger documents ongoing issues in town.  Use the search engine on top right.

 

SAM AND DAVE:

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS:

1.  R. Gibbons, History of Ocean Grove: 1869-1939 (Ocean Grove Times, 1939)

2.  K. Schmelzkopf, Landscape, ideology, and religion: a geography of Ocean Grove, New Jersey, Journal of Historical Geography, 28, 4 (2002) 589-608

3. Kevin  Chambers, Herb Herbst, and Wayne T. Bell, personal communication,( 2008)

4. Archives, Asbury Park Press, (Feb 19, 1997.)

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By Paul Goldfinger, Editor, Blogfinger.net

 

Here is a short movie, produced by documentary filmmaker David Layton in 2011. It’s offered in celebration (and, OK, self-congratulation) of our half-millionth visitor to Blogfinger. And also in tribute to a town we love.

It’s been 10 years since this movie was made by Charles Layton’s son David, a professional documentarian.  2011 was only two years since we began this experiment in small, small town journalism.

It was a great privilege for me to have Charles Layton and Mary Walton join the Blogfinger staff.  They both had been professional journalists from the Philadelphia Inquirer, and I learned so much from them.

A few years ago the Walton-Laytons moved back to the big city  (Philadelphia.)  They, of course, are irreplaceable, and that’s how its been here since they left.

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Swimwear from “Victorians’ Secrets.”  *

 

By Paul Goldfinger, history editor @Blogfinger

 

In 1869, the Founding Fathers founded Ocean Grove in Larry’s Park (later, the name was changed to Founders’ Park.) Soon thereafter, many visitors came to this popular resort. Some people wanted to live here, but sleeping in tents began to wear thin, so a building boom began, and along with that came realtors in 1872.

They opened an office on Main Avenue and called it Century 19. Many of the realtors were young ladies who wore billowing dresses with hoops and crinolines that made them extra wide. It was fun watching 2 or 3 of them squeeze inside a tent. They drove their clients around in shiny buggies that said “20% down” on the back.

The sales pitch for selling houses here must have been a challenge because of all the limitations: no horses in town on Sunday, no alcoholic drinks, no tossing pie pans on Sunday, no carousing on Saturday night, and no hanky panky.

Well, that last one was quickly tossed out due to overwhelming opposition by the folks in the choir, especially the basses and the sopranos. Besides, Grovers did need something else to do on Sunday.

Another reason why there was no “blue law” for sex was that a baby was conceived in the tent colony,  and that is where the term “Founding Father” was born.

One of the problems was that Rev. Stokes had organized a lot sale. People came from New York City and Philadelphia to buy land in this unique town. Then, somehow, it turned out that they had purchased a lease. “What the heck avenue?” they complained.

But even today, no one knows why their house is sitting on somebody else’s land. Luckily, lawyers followed the realtors into town and they made it all official.

It should be noted that you couldn’t go to Asbury Park for fun back then, because it was a sedate place having just been founded in 1871. The Asburians tried to emulate the example of Ocean Grove, but good luck with that idea.

Watch for our next installment of “OG Historical Snapshots” when we will tell the story of Jewish Grovers and how they introduced bagels with cream cheese to God’s Square Mile.

*One of the girls in the picture is April Cornell.  She eventually opened a beautiful shop on Main Avenue in the Grove, but she was forced out by some creepy developer from New York.  After that she opened in Spring Lake where the locals appreciate her despite her baggy “cover your butt”  fashions.

And now that Stokes is gone we hear that some new women’s fashions will debut this summer in the Grove.  This photo reveals an example of a California style miniskirt. Who says that miniskirts cannot get any minier? 

This photo from Santa Barbara is by SBCFireinfo/twitter. Their crowds are almost as big as ours in Ocean Grove, sponsored by the Chamber of Commercials and the OGCMA.  Will the CMA object when she shows up in the Grove for Bridgefest ?

 

And here is Dinah Washington, who knows what to do on Sunday:

 

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Founder's Park Art Show 2005. By Paul Goldfinger. ©

Founder’s Park Art Show 2005. By Paul Goldfinger. ©  Click image to see that she must have been a beautiful baby.

 

This is the sort of small-town community event that we need in OG.  So much better for the locals during the loveliest time of year in the Grove (springtime) when we should have our town to ourselves.

Am I repeating myself?  Well golly..some things bear repeating  (or is it bare?)

 

BILLIE HOLIDAY WITH THE TEDDY WILSON ORCHESTRA :

 

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