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Archive for the ‘Music from the stage’ Category

Freddie Paris (on top) with the Five Satins. Vintage 1950's

Freddie Paris (on top) with the Five Satins. Vintage 1950’s

Reposted from June 2013.   We don’t get to report about Doo Wop music any longer, so here is a very special report/interview  regarding a remarkable and famous rock and roller who loved coming back to the Great Auditorium

By Paul Goldfinger, Editor @Blogfinger

We have to get one thing out of the way —there are only four Satins now, but they will be in the Great Auditorium for the Doo Wop extavaganza on June 22, and it is going to be a wonderful show.

I spoke by phone tonight with Freddie Parris, the lead singer and the guy who wrote one of the all-time best rock and roll songs ever—“In the Still of the Night.” That song is a classic story of a boy and a girl out together, a night in May, under the stars , hugging and hoping it all never ends. But as simple as the story is, there is the marvelous and unforgettable musical composite of harmonies, rhythms, falsettos, shooby doos, Freddie Parris’s long notes and a memorable tenor sax solo in the middle. All of that comes together into a mega-hit that never declines in popularity.

Freddie Parris, more recently. Lookin' good.

Freddie Parris, more recently. Lookin’ good.

Freddie has been performing his all-time-favorite song for about fifty years and he never gets tired of it. He wrote the song in Philadelphia while he was on leave from the Air Force. His inspiration was a girl friend who later left him, but her memory lives on in this song. Later he recorded “In the Still of the Night” with some friends in the basement of St. Bernadette’s Church in New Haven.

Over the years, the Five Satins have changed personnel and styles. In 1975, they took on a disco sound and became “Black Satin,” but later they returned to their roots. Freddis Parris and the Five Satins have been performing all these years and they have played all kinds of music. In 1969 they were part of what was the first major “Oldies But Goodies” concert when they appeared on the same bill as the Coasters, the Comets, and Gary US Bonds.

He acknowledges that most of the original Doo Wop group members have passed on and that the current performers are mostly younger substitutes. We talked about how so many of these groups have changed their presentation with some developing Vegas style flashy acts and others finding new ways to present dated material. An example is Barbara Harris and the Toys, who will be there on the 22nd.  She does a wonderful take-off on the girl groups of the ’50’s and ’60’s. Then there are the “tribute bands” which imitate huge stars like the Beatles and the Stones.

Freddie thinks that the Doo Wop phenomenon will eventually fade as did the big band era which was predicted to last forever. But meanwhile Freddie and the Five (oops four) Satins will continue to do their show. He always looks forward to these concerts where he gets to reunite with old friends like the remaining Drifters.

Freddie and the Satins have been featured several time before in the Great Auditorium, and Freddie calls it a “wonderful and unique venue.” He loves the acoustics, the building and our historic town. On June 22, The Five Satins will be arriving here with four Satins and a five piece band. He and Richie Freeman are original members of the group. Freddie is 77 years old, and he admits to slowing down somewhat, but he continues to travel and perform with his bandmates, one of whom is a woman. He loves the addition of that female voice, and it really helps with the high notes, especially the one at the end of “In the Still of the Night.”

The Five Satins are no one-hit wonders. They have recorded and hit the charts with many winners over the years, and we will hear some of them at the concert. Freddie hasn’t yet determined the program for his Ocean Grove segment, but he says that “every song has its place.” Meanwhile his motto seems to be, “Let the good times roll.”

That night we will also hear John Kuse and the Excellents, The Brooklyn Bridge, and Barbara Harris and the Toys. Hosting will be 101.5’s Big Joe Henry. Tickets are $35.00 reserved and $30.00 General Admission. Order online at http://www.oceangrove.org or by phone at 800 590 4064.

Good evening ladies and germs. Blogfinger presents Freddie Parris and the Five Satins with “In the Still of the Night” A great song like this is recognizable after one bar, so grab your significant lover, I mean other, because this is the ultimate slow dance.

Here’s the link to the BF article about the Excellents and “Coney Island Baby.”

The Excellents

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By Moe Demby ©. Ocean Grove. Undated. Blogfinger staff photo. Reminds us of Charles Pierre’s poem “September Sky.”   Click to enlarge.

 

CAST OF EVITA  (2008 London cast album)   “On This Night of a Thousand Stars”  Listen to the lyrics to understand why this guy is so successful with women.

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Tuscany, Italy. 1996. By Paul Goldfinger.

Tuscany, Italy. 1996. By Paul Goldfinger. ©  (re-posted from April 2013)

By Paul Goldfinger, Editor  @Blogfinger

LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA.  This is a pas de deux from Act III of Swan Lake.  It is very difficult for one swan to do a pas de deux,  but this Italian swan is capable.  After all, he (or she?) is the only component in this photo which is in sharp focus.   Recently we posted a photograph of a seagull in a boat, misidentified as a duck. But a swan?—–never mistaken for a duck.

Has professional ballet ever been presented  in Ocean Grove?  I’ve never seen it mentioned in the OG history books. We certainly had a lot of opera and choral music, but vocalizing was always emphasized here thanks to Tali Essen Morgan who’s buddy was Caruso.  There is no mention of Tali hanging out in the Grove with prima ballerinas.

Swan Lake made its debut in Moscow in 1877 by the Bolshoi. Tchaikovsky wrote it, and it  has been almost constantly on tour ever since. Maybe someday we will have Swan Lake on the stage in the magnificent Great Auditorium of Ocean Grove, New Jersey.

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St. Remy, France. By Paul Goldfinger ©

St. Remy, France. Silver gelatin print.  By Paul Goldfinger ©  Click on the image to enlarge this chateau.  Reposted from August,  2014.  Blogfinger.net

WIEGENLIED (LULLABY) #2.    Slovenia Symphony Orchestra.  By Franz Schubert

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Broad Street. Red Bank, NJ. Birthplace of Count Basie

Broad Street. Red Bank, NJ. Birthplace of Count Basie. By Paul Goldfinger © 2013.  Reposted on Blogfinger.

SOUNDTRACK: “It Had to be You.” The Count Basie Orchestra.

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San Gimignano is a medieval hill town in Tuscany (Siena region) Italy. By Paul Goldfinger. © Undated silver gelatin darkroom print.

San Gimignano is a medieval walled hill town in Tuscany (Siena region) Italy. By Paul Goldfinger. © Undated silver gelatin darkroom print.

DAME KIRI de KANAWA    from Tosca  “Viss d’arte”  (Giacomo Puccini)

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Miley Cyrus performs her Bangerz Tour live at Perth Arena on October 23, 2014 in Perth, Australia.

Miley Cyrus performs her Bangerz Tour live at Perth Arena on October 23, 2014 in Perth, Australia.

Miley Cyrus is a 22 year old pop star who has been evolving from her kid-stuff role on the Disney Channel as Hannah Montana.   As she segues into a woman, some of her antics have garnered negative attention, but she was the host of Saturday Night Live on October 3, and her performance of the “Twinkle Song”  (shown below)  revealed her to be a vulnerable and emotional young lady who can dig deep into her soul and come up with a sensational heart-felt rendering of her new composition. —Paul Goldfinger @Blogfinger

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Left Bank, Paris.  c. 1998.  By Paul Goldfinger ©

Left Bank, Paris. c. 1998. By Paul Goldfinger ©  Click to enlarge

KELSEY GRAMMER AND DOUGLAS HODGE.   “Song on the Sand.”  From La Cage Aux Folles.  Broadway cast album.

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Naples, Florida. 2015. By Paul Goldfinger ©

Naples, Florida. 2015. By Paul Goldfinger ©

SIMPLY RED   “Every Time We Say Goodbye”   from his album Simplified

This is one of my all time favorite songs. Words and music by Cole Porter for a stage show in 1944.

The lyrics are appreciated viscerally and down to your soul. One of the cleverest lyric lines in music occurs when it goes, “There’s no love song finer, but how strange the change from major to minor, every time we say goodbye.”

If  you listen carefully you might be able to appreciate the change in chord progression during that line from A flat major to A flat minor—a brilliant musical moment where the music and lyrics match exactly and the meaning is deepened by the chord change.

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Naples Botanical Garden. February, 2015. By Paul Goldfinger

Naples Botanical Gardens. February, 2015. By Paul Goldfinger ©  Click to enlarge.

JESSICA MOLASKEY.  This song was written in 1921 for an African-American review called  Shuffle Along

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