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Archive for the ‘Music from the stage’ Category

Bohemian Girl: Internet photo

Bohemian Girl: Internet photo

 

Written in 1843 by M.W. Balfe, this aria is the most famous from that work. In the 20th century, the story was adapted for a Laurel and Hardy movie.

The singer, Meav Ni Mhachatha is from Ireland and is a beautiful blond with a sweet voice, one of the founders of the group Celtic Woman, an all female ensemble which is known for performing traditional Irish music.  —-PG

From Act II of the Bohemian Girl:   “I Dreamt I Dwelled in Marble Halls,”

“I dreamt that suitors sought my hand;

“That knights upon bended knee,

“And with vows no maiden heart could withstand,

“They pledg’d their faith to me;”

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Ocean Grove. October 3, 2014

Ocean Grove. October 3, 2014. By Paul Goldfinger ©  Click to enlarge.

Count Basie orchestra.   “Flight of the Foo Birds”  from Woody’s movie Scenes from a Mall

 

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From the New York City Street Series by Paul Goldfinger © "He Neve Did THAT Before!"

Repost from the New York City Street Series by Paul Goldfinger ©  Click to make her larger.

By Paul Goldfinger, Editor  @Blogfinger

If you heard this song for the first time, as I did yesterday on the Jonathan Schwartz show on WNYC radio,  performed by cabaret star Rebecca Luker, you would never have thought that it was not written to be sung by a woman.  It certainly worked for Rebecca who was singing frankly about sex, love and betrayal.

I thought, “This is a gutsy song for her to do, but women are so outspoken these days about sex.”  Women used to be very coy on that subject, because it was part of the female allure to say little that is overt, but to be able to cover that waterfront with traditional female flirtatiousness and body language, while revealing their true interests only later in the course of human events.

My old friends from high school often remember the fifties and how, if we only knew that our female classmates  were as interested as we were,….oh well, getting back to Rebecca Luker, a beautiful chanteuse who was once Sarah Brightman’s understudy—-that speaks volumes on her qualifications.

So I liked this daring modern take on old themes.    I had posted Rebecca Luker once before on Blogfinger  with a song from “Wonderful Town.”  When I looked up today’s  music I discovered  that it was written for a review in 2005 called “Songs From an Unmade Bed.”  The show contained 18 songs written by different composers, and our featured song today, “He Never Did That Before,” was written by a woman, Debra Barsha.

But low and behold, I also found out that it was a  one man show and was about gay male relationships in New York City.

So here is Rebecca Luker, from her 2009 album Greenwich Time, singing  “He Never Did That Before.”

 

Rebecca Luker

 

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Naples, Florida. 2015. By Paul Goldfinger ©

Naples, Florida. 2015. By Paul Goldfinger ©

SIMPLY RED   “Every Time We Say Goodbye”   from his album Simplified

This is one of my all time favorite songs. Words and music by Cole Porter for a stage show in 1944.

The lyrics are appreciated viscerally and down to your soul. One of the cleverest lyric lines in music occurs when it goes, “There’s no love song finer, but how strange the change from major to minor, every time we say goodbye.”

If  you listen carefully you might be able to appreciate the change in chord progression during that line from A flat major to A flat minor—a brilliant musical moment where the music and lyrics match exactly and the meaning is deepened by the chord change.

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Untitled. By Paul Goldfinger ©

Untitled. September 2011.  Ocean Grove.  By Paul Goldfinger ©

 

RITA GARDNER.  “They Were You.”  from the Fantasticks

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Brandywine River Museum. Chadds Ford, Pa. By Paul Goldfinger ©

Brandywine River Museum. Chadds Ford, Pa. By Paul Goldfinger © Brandywine River Series. 2013.  Silver gelatin darkroom print.  Tri-X.

THE FANTASTICKS:

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St. Remy, France. By Paul Goldfinger ©

St. Remy, France. Silver gelatin darkroom print.  By Paul Goldfinger ©  Click on the image to enlarge this chateau.   Blogfinger.net

 

EVA CASSIDY:   “It Doesn’t Matter Anymore” from her album Imagine.

 

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NYC Street Series. 2012. By Paul Goldfinger ©

NYC Street Series. 2012. By Paul Goldfinger © Click to enlarge

IVY BENSON AND HER ALL GIRLS ORCHESTRA  (A 1940’s group from England)

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OG Flea Market, June1, 2013. By Paul Goldfinger. Left click for better look.

OG Flea Market, June 1, 2013. By Paul Goldfinger. Click on image for better look.  ©  Girls and boys in their summer clothes.

RODGERS AND HAMMERSTEIN.  Medley from Carousel.  London production with original cast:

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Freddie Paris (on top) with the Five Satins. Vintage 1950's

Freddie Parris (on top) with the Five Satins. Vintage 1950’s.   

Reposted from June, 2013.   We don’t get to report about Doo Wop music any longer, so here is a very special report/interview  regarding a remarkable and famous rock and roller who loved coming back to the Great Auditorium

By Paul Goldfinger, Editor @Blogfinger

We have to get one thing out of the way —there are only four Satins now, but they will be in the Great Auditorium for the Doo Wop extavaganza on June 22, 2013.and it is going to be a wonderful show.

I spoke by phone tonight with Freddie Parris, the lead singer and the guy who wrote one of the all-time best rock and roll songs ever—“In the Still of the Night.” That song is a classic story of a boy and a girl out together, a night in May, under the stars , hugging and hoping it all never ends.

But as simple as the story is, there is the marvelous and unforgettable musical composite of harmonies, rhythms, falsettos, shooby doos, Freddie Parris’s long notes, and a memorable tenor sax solo in the middle. All of that comes together into a mega-hit that never declines in popularity.

Freddie Parris, more recently. Lookin' good.

Freddie Parris, more recently. Lookin’ good.

Freddie has been performing his all-time-favorite song for about fifty years and he never gets tired of it. He wrote the song in Philadelphia while he was on leave from the Air Force. His inspiration was a girl friend who later left him, but her memory lives on in this song. Later he recorded “In the Still of the Night” with some friends in the basement of St. Bernadette’s Church in New Haven.

Over the years, the Five Satins have changed personnel and styles. In 1975, they took on a disco sound and became “Black Satin,” but later they returned to their roots.

Freddie Parris and the Five Satins have been performing all these years and they have played all kinds of music. In 1969 they were part of what was the first major “Oldies But Goodies” concert when they appeared on the same bill as the Coasters, the Comets, and Gary US Bonds.

He acknowledges that most of the original Doo Wop group members have passed on and that the current performers are mostly younger substitutes. We talked about how so many of these groups have changed their presentation with some developing Vegas style flashy acts and others finding new ways to present dated material.

An example is Barbara Harris and the Toys, who will be here on the 22nd.  She does a wonderful take-off on the girl groups of the ’50’s and ’60’s. Then there are the “tribute bands” which imitate huge stars like the Beatles and the Stones.

Freddie thinks that the Doo Wop phenomenon will eventually fade as did the big band era which was predicted to last forever. But meanwhile Freddie and the Five (oops four) Satins will continue to do their show. He always looks forward to these concerts where he gets to reunite with old friends like the remaining Drifters.

Freddie and the Satins have been featured several times before in the Great Auditorium of Ocean Grove, NJ, , and Freddie calls it a “wonderful and unique venue.” He loves the acoustics, the building and our historic town.

On June 22, The Five Satins will be arriving here with four Satins and a five piece band. He and Richie Freeman are original members of the group. Freddie is 77 years old, and he admits to slowing down somewhat, but he continues to travel and perform with his bandmates, one of whom is a woman. He loves the addition of that female voice, and it really helps with the high notes, especially the one at the end of “In the Still of the Night.”

The Five Satins are no one-hit wonders. They have recorded and hit the charts with many winners over the years, and we will hear some of them at the concert. Freddie hasn’t yet determined the program for his Ocean Grove segment, but he says that “every song has its place.” Meanwhile his motto seems to be, “Let the good times roll.”

That night we will also hear John Kuse and the Excellents, The Brooklyn Bridge, and Barbara Harris and the Toys. Hosting will be 101.5’s Big Joe Henry. Tickets are $35.00 reserved and $30.00 General Admission. Order online at http://www.oceangrove.org or by phone at 800 590 4064.

Good evening ladies and germs. Blogfinger presents Freddie Parris and the Five Satins with “In the Still of the Night” A great song like this is recognizable after one bar, so grab your significant lover, I mean other, because this is the ultimate slow dance.

Here’s the link to the BF article about the Excellents and “Coney Island Baby.”

The Excellents

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