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Silent night

Ocean Grove. 2012. Blogfinger photo. ©

BOB DYLAN  From South Pacific and from Dylan’s album Shadows in the Night

 

 

Mid-town. NYC Street Series. 2014. Paul Goldfinger photograph ©  Click to see these college grads.

AVENUE Q CAST:  The thing about being a talking head is that you don’t need clothes from the neck down—basically just a hat.

Nagles Saturday Night. Main Avenue.  August 2012. Paul Goldfinger photograph ©  Click to enlarge.

 

“Low Tide at Wesley Lake”  Blogfinger photo.©

Water  near the retaining wall by Founders’ Park in OG. Blogfinger  (Stephen Goldfinger)  photo. 12/7/16 © Click it and then take a deep breath. Is it any wonder that not a single bird was in sight?

Wesley Lake, west end. March 28, 2017. Paul Goldfinger photo © Click to enlarge. Photograph from the muckrakers at Blogfinger–Paul Goldfinger.© March, 2017.

By Jack Bredin, researcher and reporter for Blogfinger.net  and Paul Goldfinger, Editor@Blogfinger.net

Blogfinger has posted a variety of articles about Wesley Lake pollution. Today we feature yet another piece on that subject which contains some new elements which we have not addressed before.

Q:  The Lenape Indians used Wesley Lake as a source of food.  Now the Lake is reserved for recreation and conservation—-or is it?

A:  According to the Neptune township Tax Map (effective Jan. 1, 2015) Wesley Lake is now a municipal facility to be used to treat dirty street-water runoff. The Lake’s name has been changed to ” Wesley Detention/Retention  Basin” under the supervision of the Departments of Public Works.

Q: Who is responsible for this?

A:  It starts with the Neptune Township Committee along with the Mayor and Council of Asbury Park.   The  two governing bodies are in  charge, so  the buck stops with them, or in this case, the pollution starts and stops with them.    Officials from both towns took an oath  that would include managing the welfare of the Lake for recreational use.  It should be noted that most of the dirty street-water runoff comes from AP.

Q: How did this happen?

A:  It happened when the mayors of both Neptune and AP took their charters and hung them on the developers’ walls.

Q:  Who can correct this plethora of problems involving the Lake’s rehabilitation and restoration?

A: The Wesley Lake Commission. Or can they?  Jack attended a meeting of the Commission on May 16, 2017, and suggested that they should not allow street-water runoff to enter the Lake because that is causing the Lake to be polluted. And the streets are not part of the Lake’s natural watershed.

Discussion:

A member of the Wesley Lake Commission representing Neptune’s DPW  (Dept. of Public Works) said, “The streets are in the ‘watershed area,’  and in New Jersey you are permitted by the Dept. of Environmental Protection to allow street water runoff to drain into a lake.”

But the “watershed area” includes all the land that drains into the lake, and by that definition, it does includes street run-off.  But there is a semantic issue here.  He would be correct if the streets were a part of the Lake’s “natural watershed” and not just “in the watershed area.”    The”natural water-shed area”  is desirable, but dirty street water is not part of that.

So his argument boils down to “let’s keep polluting the Lake illegally.”

You might have noticed the Rainwater Park near the train station in Asbury Park.  That is a example of a desirable “natural” water-shed area where the rain is purified by the soil and plantings and then the clean water drains into the lake.

And if the name change from Wesley Lake to “Wesley Detention/Retention Basin” had been done legally by Resolution of the Neptune Committee with permission from the New Jersey DEP Green Acres Program,  then the streets would become “the watershed” for a detention/retention basin, but there was no such Resolution or Green Acres permission.  Note that a detention/retention basin is an actual structural facility to clean the water draining into the Lake.. So far all we have is a name change on the Neptune Tax Map.  We don’t even have a map that shows the Lake’s water-shed.

So what’s in a name?–in this case, nothing.

Another member of the Commission said, “The condition of Wesley Lake is the same now as it has been for the last 10,000 years, and the condition of the Lake’s mud is a naturally occurring condition found in every lake.”

We think the dead fish never got the professor’s message.  And, we have to remind the professor, that 10,000 years ago they were first brewing beer in Mesopotamia, but there are no records of what Wesley Lake looked like then.  We barely know about it from records of 1869. We do know that it was much different than it is now—then it was a full blown estuary.

And don’t forget, the water may look or test clear sometimes, but what toxins are trapped in the mud? They don’t test the mud, only the water, and how often do they test the water?

We may be at a crossroads, but we still have the choice of which road to take, before it is too late:

1. “The road to recovery:”  Stopping the dirty street water from entering the Lake would be the first step in the Lake’s road to recovery
2. “The road to “Condo-City:”  This road would be a fantasy by certain factions in Ocean Grove who might see the Lake as a dead-end street where the polluted silt (ie mud)  builds up to a point where dredging and disposing of all that polluted mud becomes economically unfeasible.
And that leads to a scripted conclusion that it would be more cost effective to “cap” the mud, fill in the Lake, and build some modern, up-to-date condominiums.  It could happen!

LEANN RIMES:

 

 

 

 

 

All photos from today’s Ocean Grove Yard Sales. This is at Asbury Avenue—Vicki’s house; always a winner for yard sales, and a beautiful location besides. All photos by Paul Goldfinger. Blogfinger.net © Click to enlarge all photos.


By Paul Goldfinger, Editor @Blogfinger

For the third year in a row, the weather posed a threat to the Town-Wide Yard Sale. Last week we postponed the May 13th setting because of horrible rain.  Today, May 20, we expected sunshine, but when we woke up we heard wind gusts, and then, looking out the window, we saw clouds.   It was chilly at 60 degrees, and there were a few little showers late in the morning, causing sellers to open up, cover up, and then start again, often  moving to the porch briefly.  One out-of-towner was cold, so he bought a hoodie from us.

A little rain moved the action onto porches, but only for a few minutes. Blogfinger photo Mt. Hermon Way. ©

We estimate that the Grove had about 60 yard sale sites.  We signed up 49, and there were a number of others that joined in without signing up–I met 3 of those without having to look very hard.   Asbury Park also had a town sale today but they were expecting only 25, and that is over an area larger than the Grove.   Our yard sale manager Vincent  Cannavo said that the density of yard sales in our small town makes for a perfect location for an annual town-wide sale.   Last year we outnumbered Bradley Beach.  There is no data as to how many of our sellers failed to open up because of the weather, but I don’t think there were more than a few.

It’s impossible to know the number of attendees at our yard sales,  Yard sailors told me that they had a fairly successful day  with a steady stream of shoppers despite the lack of sunshine.

As usual, the best thing about the TWYS  is the social component.  We met Grovers whom we never met before and we saw others whom we see only occasionally,  as well as visitors some of whom are regulars in town and who love the yard sales.  They come, often stay over,  eat out, and patronize our merchants.

Eileen and I met a multi-lingual visitor (4 languages) who bought bowls from us and did a fine impression of a Parisian waiter.  A women from Staten Island gave me a lecture as to why rubbing lemongrass oil over your liver was better than Lipitor for cholesterol.   Exchanging stories and observations about our town is always fun, especially with strangers who give us some “out-of-the bubble” points of view.

A couple of out-of towners won the fashion award on Mt. Hermon Way.  He bought a record “Stand  By Me” but she already was.    Blogfinger photo. 5/20/17.

Many Grovers and visitors stopped by our place to talk about Blogfinger, and, without exception, they were supportive. Some commenters came out of the closet to help me match the face with the pseudonym. Aggravated Curmudgeon’s wife told me  that Curmudgeon is actually a nice guy and isn’t always aggravated. He was home selling stuff.

Conversations are always part of the action and are very entertaining and informative. 5/20/17.   Paul Goldfinger photo on Delaware Avenue.

We met visitors  from the outer reaches of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Cincinnati,  and New York—Staten Island, Brooklyn and Manhattan.  Some of the Grovers we spoke to are new residents  in town including Lucy and Reena (both of whom had sales today.)

This crew on Delaware Avenue put their sale on hold for a pizza break in their side yard.  They are candidates for our OG lifestyles award. Blogfinger photo. © 5/20/17.

Several early visitors at our sale were looking for vinyl, but what interested me was that one was a young man.  It turns out young music lovers are taking a keen interest in collecting and playing vinyl.  An antique dealer from a neighboring town told me that sales of “old’ antiques were down because young couples aren’t interested, but there is enhanced interest in vintage stuff such as from the forties and the fifties.

So thanks to all of you Grovers who participated.   It actually can be fairly stressful and difficult to prepare for a yard sale, and when it’s over, you’re still not done working.  But despite that, it is fun.

MISS PEGGY LEE:

This portrait is of Eileen when she was a barefoot doctor with the Red Chinese. But seriously folks…I have no idea what was going on here.. But Dr. John (below) is another story in New Orleans.. Photo by Paul Goldfinger.

DR. JOHN   “My Indian Red” from season 1 of HBO’s saga called Tremé.

Central Park. August, 2014. By Paul Goldfinger. ©

NNENNA FREELON:

Purple Galinule. By Bob Bowné

“Hey…thought your readers would find this to be fun….

“This Purple Gallinule has been hanging out in the yard here, down at the beach for the last four days.
He is native of Florida area according to The Audubon Society…so he must be here on a Victorian vacation.
Check out those yellow chicken legs!”
—Bob
Y. RADIER   It’s a tango  “La Paloma.”

Hi Paul:

Greetings from Manhattan. There is a common aid to navigation — often used in coastal waters — that has always had a special meaning for me as a poet. Here is “The Bell Buoy,” a poem from my 2008 collection, Father of Water.

Best wishes,

Charles Pierre

Shivering Sand. Photogravure by Wylie. Undated

Shivering Sand. Photogravure by Wylie. Undated. Click to see the bell buoy more clearly.  Reposted this poem from 2015 Blogfinger.net. ©

BELL BUOY

By Charles Pierre.

There is something singular in the rhythms

of the bell buoy, as it rings in the wake

of an unknown vessel already passing

on to its destination. The restless gestures

of this solitaire, anchored in the routine

of the sea, are a directing presence,

even in this hostile chopping,

metal on metal clanging from its heart,

clanging down the chain to the muddy anchor,

clanging out above the waves, creating

a point in the pointless sea, echoing out

to another, its clanging a song

of hope through these splintered waters,

a hard human song in an inhuman place,

something with a ringing truth to it

of who we are, something to sustain us,

wherever this imagined drifting leads.

 

Sounds:  bell buoy ringing; waves hitting boat:

Music on the water, from the film  The Sand Pebbles  (1966) with Steve McQueen.:

MATT MONROE

Playing footsie

Ocean Grove beach. 2014. Paul Goldfinger photo ©

Ocean Grove beach. 2014. Paul Goldfinger photo ©  Click to enlarge.  Blogfinger.net

BEVERLY KENNEY:

 

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