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Archive for the ‘Music: The Power to Enchant’ Category

Harmony 3 sculpture by Daniel Kainz (1993). Hamilton, NJ. Paul Goldfinger photo © 2007

Harmony 3 sculpture by Daniel Kainz (1993). Grounds for Sculpture.  Hamilton, NJ. Paul Goldfinger photo © 2007   Click to enlarge

YO-YO MA.    Ennio Morricone’s “Gabriel’s Oboe” from the film The Mission

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By Paul Goldfinger ©

By Paul Goldfinger
©

AARON NEVILLE:

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Notre Dame, Paris. By Paul Goldfinger. Re-post from 2012.

Soundtrack:  Ave Maria, Bach.   London Philharmonic Choir and Orchestra.

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Leon Redbone

After the horrid Surf Avenue fire of March, 2011, we realized that the healing process had begun, and this song seemed so appropriate to help boost the spirits of those who were in pain.      —PG

Leon Redbone with a beloved Disney song from Pinocchio, sung in the movie by Jiminy Cricket:

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Windows at the top reaches of the Tabernacle. All photos by Paul Goldfinger ©

Windows at the top reaches of the Tabernacle. All photos by Paul Goldfinger © Click on all photographs to enlarge them.

By Paul Goldfinger MD, Editor @Blogfinger.net   Re-posted from June, 2014.

The Bishop Janes Tabernacle is the oldest permanent structure in Ocean Grove, build in 1877.  It is an airy, open building consisting basically of one room and  a center section on top where  a sweep of windows allows light to stream in from above  and illuminate the seating below–symbolic perhaps, or very practical, or both.

Light and breezes come inside. ©

Light and breezes come inside. ©

Ted Bell, Ocean Grove historian and author, showed us the 19th century ventilation system which keeps the place cool.  Downstairs there is a ring of large doors and windows.   The latter open in a curious way, but there is a purpose to the design. The window aims the warm breezes upward where they can stream through the top  row of windows.

Ted Bell shows how the lower level windows open. ©

Ted Bell shows how the lower level windows open. ©

Outside, the light trickles and flows through the trees to hit the Tabernacle and create moving patterns on its outside walls and illumination for the prayer books inside.

outside one

 

BACH:  Double concerto in D minor for 2 violins and strings.  With Yehudi Menuhin, Alberto Lysy, and Camerata Lysy Gstaad.

 

—- Paul Goldfinger, Editor @Blogfinger

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Next stop is the Jumping Brook Country Club in Neptune. May 22, 2015. Blogfinger photo by Paul Goldfinger. ©

Next stop is the Jumping Brook Country Club in Neptune. May 22, 2015. Blogfinger photo on Main Avenue in Ocean Grove  by Paul Goldfinger. ©  Click to enlarge.

Five friends posing for pictures in Firemen’s Park, Ocean Grove.  How beautiful can you look?  How wonderful the day? Thus we are re-posting this fine memory for these friends.

We found this happy crew standing for photographs in front of the bell, but get outta here! What about that gorgeous chariot at the curb, waiting to take them to the Neptune High School Prom?  Let’s take the picture over there.

These five Scarlet Fliers are a group of friends—they said so.  How lucky can you get? Let’s get close together and how about a big smile?

So who do we have here?   We have, left to right,  Nicholas Severson, Rebecca Sokol, Victoria Alaniz, Sasha Murphy, and Max Schmidt.

The red “limo” is a 1940 Ford owned by Michael Yencarelli.  The car has been in his family for 30 years.

Since we have a car from the 1940’s, let’s go retro for music from that same era.

Ladies and gentleman, from the Sands Hotel in Las Vegas, it’s Frank Sinatra with Count Basie and his Orchestra:

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George Tice © Belmont Hotel, Asbury Park. 1974. This is a selenium-toned silver gelatin print.

By Paul Goldfinger ©. The Belmont burned down about 7 years ago.

By Paul Goldfinger ©. rear view.  Photo taken before the Belmont was destroyed by fire.

Paul Goldfinger, MD.  Editor @Blogfinger.   Re-posted from 2016.  The editor’s note below still rings true in 2018 and has been updated.

There were two historic (over 100 years old) hotels in A.Park which were adjacent to each other on Asbury Avenue—-The Belmont and the Atlantic.   The Belmont had 50 rooms, but it was vacant in 2006.   The entire block was scheduled for demolition, but it burned down during a 5 alarm fire, along with the Atlantic, in December of that year.  The balloon construction made for a deluge with quick destruction up and down the buildings.

An AP historian said, in an APP article, that the buildings were considered historically significant to Asbury Park and Monmouth County.
“This site is one of the small remaining number of turn-of-the-century hotels that once flourished,” he said.

“The local historical society wanted to save the Atlantic and Belmont Hotels and have them refurbished to be used for residential purposes, but the society’s efforts were thwarted several years ago by the City Council and redevelopers,” he said.

“And, now that the fire has destroyed the hotels, there is nothing left to do but start from the ground up.  They could have been adapted to modern uses, but now they are gone,” he said.

Residents said they were upset to see history disappear so quickly. “I hate to see it go,” Robert Razminas, 48, an Asbury Park resident for 25 years, said as the buildings burned. “These old places are Asbury Park history. They should be restored and kept up.”

George Tice* is one of America’s most famous photographers.  He is especially known for his work in his native New Jersey.  His specialty is documenting historic old buildings and neighborhoods, as in his photographs of Paterson, an old immigrant based blue collar city.

The Tice photograph above of the Belmont is from an on-line gallery web site   (Paddle8).  In 1974 he photographed two Victorian houses in Ocean Grove. Tice has published about 20 photographic books including one about the Amish in Pennsylvania and another in Ireland and England called “Stone Walls, Grey Skies.” A platinum print from that book resides in Ocean Grove. Contact us if you want to view it. One of his most important books is “Paterson.”

Here is a link to a BF piece in 2013 which shows some of his images:

https://blogfinger.net/2013/11/08/tibet-in-jersey-the-newark-museum-scores-with-exhibits-on-tibet-and-george-tice-jersey-photographer/

PHILLIP SMITH ( of Ocean Grove and the NY Philharmonic) on trumpet along with JOSEPH TURIN on piano play Gershwin’s “Someone to Watch Over Me”  Note: I spotted Phil—Phil Smith and the NY Philharmonic–on TV for the Live From Lincoln Center New Years Eve show on PBS.  The camera caught him having a string of rests and gazing ahead as Yo Yo Ma played a tango. He has since retired from the Phil, but he still spends summers in the Grove and plays in the Great Auditorium.

EDITOR’S NOTE:  This article rings true as we think about historic preservation in Ocean Grove. These two Asburian hotels could have been re-purposed into residences while maintaing their  historic “bones.”  As noted before by Blogfinger, Asbury has an advantage for preservation because of the available land for parking, but that didn’t save these two structures—they were destined to be replaced by condominiums.

Evidently the idea of remodeling them into residences was not considered because AP has turned over that entire oceanfront area to trash-and -build-new developers without any worry about history.  They  don’t seem to care about AP’s history and they don’t mind turning much of their reclaimed property into condominiums. I recall when the beautiful old Metropolitan Hotel, a nostalgic place, which I visited before it’s death spiral, with much history, was allowed to rot and then be demolished.

However there is a huge difference between the two towns:  Ocean Grove is on the National and State Historic Registers, so we have an obligation to try and save historic buildings and not mow them down like dead ducks. But turning old hotels into condo’s here is contrary to our Master Plan which has a vision that is totally different than Asbury’s, and we really shouldn’t allow more space-clogging condo conversions of old hotels to occur, especially in defiance of RSIS parking standards.

Our old hotels need to be dealt with in ways that meet the special needs of our town, with the interests of the people and the history placed ahead of the developers and the politicians who want more money from the Cash-Cow-By-The-Sea.

Current related issues in 2018 directs our attention to the Aurora Hotel and the Warrington. We have posted articles about both, and both face an uncertain future in Ocean Grove;  and the best we can  hope for in both cases would be single family Victorian designer homes.

Phil Smith’s solo above  (“Someone to Watch over Me”) reminds us to protect our town’s historic treasures.

—Paul Goldfinger, Editor.

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Tuscany. c. 1996. By Paul Goldfinger. © Click left for larger view

Cingue Terre, Italy.   c. 1996. By Paul Goldfinger. © Click left for larger view. Reposted from 2013.

HOT CLUB OF SAN FRANCISCO. “Souvenir de Villingen” from the album Yerba Buena Bounce  (composed by Stephane Grappelli)

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Warren Vache on jazz trumpet at Waterloo Village c. 1995. By Paul Goldfinger ©

Warren Vache on jazz trumpet at Waterloo Village (Sussex County, NJ)   c. 1995. By Paul Goldfinger ©   Reposted from BF 2013.

There has always been an active jazz scene in New Jersey.  Many well known musicians live and perform here, with considerable overlap in NYC.  I’ve heard Warren Vaché  at Waterloo Village and at the 92nd Street Y in New York. He was born in Rahway and is well known among jazz musicians.  He has a beautiful tone.  Many of the concerts in Jersey are sponsored by the 40 year old New Jersey Jazz Society.   NJ Jazz Society link .

This recording is from an album called  “Uptown Lowdown,” a jazz tribute to the Big Apple. Warren Vaché  is part of this ten- man band, and I especially like this piece called “Rose of Washington Square/ Broadway Rose.”  The clarinet player is the excellent Ken Peplowski.  And listen for Warren’s trumpet.

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By Paul Goldfinger, Editor @Blogfinger    (Reposted from July 28, 2013 and 2015. )

Ocean Grove is known for its music programs. We have live music on the beach, in the parks, in the Auditorium, and on Main Avenue, but here’s something you may not know about. The Emburys are a group of shore guys who love to get together on a street corner or in an echo chamber like the Casino and bring back that authentic acapella doo-wop sound. This is how that early form of rock and roll developed, especially in the inner cities of New York and Philly. Boogie is the guy who sings bass and is one Grover whom many of us know. The bass always stands out in these groups.*

We found them on a Sunday afternoon performing an old tune by “Shep and the Limelites” in front of the Pathway Market at the corner of Mt. Hermon Way and Pilgrim Pathway in the shadows of the Great Auditorium where, just the night before, the Beach Boys were doing the surfing thing. But today, it was doo wops, and the guys hit the harmonies and the high/low notes with no backup instruments. This music is not easy to do. A small crowd had gathered to give them some deserved applause.

*Boogie,” Robert Napolitano, passed on April 27.

KENNY VANCE AND THE PLANOTONES: “Looking for an Echo”

And this is the full monty version by SHEP AND THE LIMELITES of “Daddy’s Home” (“ratta-tat”)

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