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Archive for the ‘Guest photographer’ Category

Anna Murphy

Untitled.   By  Anna Murphey  Re-posted from September, 2013.

Anna Murphey is a retired professional photojournalist who often vacations in Ocean Grove and whose work we have shown in the past.    (BF link for Anna    Anna Murphey photographer  )  She is currently visiting our town to be here at its most beautiful time—September.

Anna sent us the photo above and she explains the image in her own words:

“I am attaching a photo I took at Swartswood State Park one April-a warm day, it’s one of my favorites and it ran in the New Jersey Herald during my tenure as Chief Photographer.”

We also asked Anna to suggest a song for her delightful portrait of a young lady.

This is her reply, “Good Day Sunshine,”  by the Beatles.  As an aside, I saw the Beatles at Shea Stadium in 1964, I still have my ticket stub, I guess that kind of dates me.”

THE BEATLES:

Editor’s note:  We learned that Anna had passed in 2017.  She was a fine photographer and her last contact with Blogfinger was 2016

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Girl Lifts Boy

Girl Lifts Boy  ( 1st and 3rd images courtesy Mina Son)

New York City

New York City  (Internet photo)

xxxxxx

Levitt with James Agee

Levitt’s most important book

By Paul Goldfinger  (re-posted from 2013 on Blogfinger)   We have featured a group of important female photographers.

Those of you who follow photography on Blogfinger know that I am a big fan of black and white  street photography.   Some of the finest  photographers in that genre were active in the 1930’s through the 1950’s in New York City and Paris.  Among the best are Walker Evans, Eugene Atget, Andre Kertesz, Lee Friedlander and our guest photographer Helen Levitt, who was one of the pioneers.

Helen Levitt (1913-2009) photographed on the streets of New York City for over 70 years, both in black and white and color.  She worked with Walker Evans in the 1930’s, and her work was shown at the first photo exhibit held at MOMA in 1939.  She was an innovator in the street photography genre.

A documentary film maker named Tanya Sleiman has made a film, “95 Lives,” about Helen Levitt, and we heard about it from Mina Son, the producer, in November. Mina was kind enough to send us two photographs for our blog post and also a link to a very fine short film made by Tanya.  I think you will enjoy it, as she tells us about her project. It is a unique treat for our blog.  Thank you  Tanya and Mina.  The fund raising drive mentioned was completed in December 2012.

According to Mina Son, “95 Lives seeks to change the reality that Helen Levitt is a major female artist of the 20th century, someone who innovated in photography and film, yet is virtually unknown outside of elite art circles. This is why we are making this film.”

“Through Helen Levitt’s lens, we have found magic and visual poetry in our everyday lives. In helping her legacy live on, we hope her work inspires countless more generations of photographers to introduce the work and life of Helen Levitt to audiences all over.”

Helen Levitt short

SOUNDTRACK:  I guess the thing that has fascinated me about photography, ever since childhood, is the magic—-the freezing of a moment.  It is a way to capture that moment and preserve it.  Wouldn’t it have been great if photography had been invented one century sooner?  We could see Washington crossing the Delaware or Napoleon at Waterloo.

Or, in our own lives, we can see how life was over 50 years ago, as in these images by Helen Levitt where ordinary street scenes back then now become extraordinary.  This song matches up with these photos.

Jerry Orbach from the Fantasticks:

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July 5, 2018. Margaret Hook of OG. Photo shot from OG across Wesley Lake. © Special to Blogfinger.

 

ROY ORBISON:

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By Anna Murphey.

By Anna Murphey. 2010. Last posted here in 2013.

DAVE’S TRUE STORY.  “Blue Moon.”  From the movie Jack Goes Boating:

Anna is a sometime Ocean Grover and a fan of Blogfinger.   She is a retired photojournalist who responded to our offer to submit her work  to us.    Of this image, she said, “I am including a photo I took at the Nous Theater, Blairstown,on opening night,  looking down the hall toward the lobby, with brilliant orange and reds accented with deep blue drawing patrons through the theater . The colors struck me and I love the almost painterly quality of the photo.”

We think it is wonderful also,  with its strong use of colors and perspective. We hope to post some more of Anna’s work.

Thank you, Anna.

Paul Goldfinger, Editor  @Blogfinger

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Ocean Grove. November 9, 2014. By Mike Kalish. ©

A Park near OG. November 9, 2014. By Mike Kalish of OG. ©  Reposted from 2014.

“All the Things You Are” was written for a 1939 Broadway  show called Very Warm for May by Jerome Kern (music) and Oscar Hammerstein II  (lyrics.) Susequently it was in the movie “Broadway Rhythm” 1944.   Miles Davis said that these lyrics were his favorite.

“You are the angel glow that lights a star.

The dearest things I know are what you are.”

CARLY SIMON

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This is one of my favorite photographs, and Diana Krall’s “White Christmas”  is also very special. And so is the Christmas season where sleigh bells ring—are you listening?

Christmas music can be monotonous after awhile in December, but so much great music is about Christmas, so I like to post it out of season to show its uniqueness. It’s like the jewelry store principle:  just take one diamond out at  a time and show it by itself on black velvet in a light that makes it glow  —– PG from OG

 

“The White Night” Central Park, Christmas Eve, 1932. By Adolph Fassbender   Re-posted from Blogfinger. 2014.

This photograph is from the January 27, 1997 issue of the New Yorker magazine. It was part of a photography exhibit review featuring the work of Adolph Fassbender (1884-1980). He was an artist who followed the romantic painterly Pictorialist style of photography long after it fell into disfavor around 1915. The quote below is from the New Yorker piece about this image. The title of the  article was “Slow Dazzle.”   —PG

” ‘The White Night,’ made on Christmas Eve, 1932, in Central Park, during a late-afternoon blizzard, is one of the highlights of the Fassbender show opening this week at Gallery 292, in SoHo. The buildings on the Plaza were invisible but for a faint glow; the artist got off just one three-and-a-half-minute exposure before his shutter froze. Out of raging wind and snow he coaxed this woolly, lamplit nocturne — a tribute not to speed but to contentment and rest. Photograph shows a path in Central Park covered with snow, bordered by bare black branches, and buildings in the distance with lighted windows seen through mist.”

–reprinted from Blogfinger.  By Paul Goldfinger, Editor.

DIANA KRALL

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Chaim

 

By Paul Goldfinger, Editor @Blogfinger.  Click on the images to make them bigger.

Chaim Kanner (1943-2000) was born in Nice. He studied in Europe and photographed in France and Italy. In 1967 he spent a year photographing in the US and Mexico. He worked as a professional photographer, first in the commercial field and then later in the fine art realm. He moved to the US in 1981.

I met him only once. It was in the 1980’s in mid-town Manhattan. He was a strange sight: an orthodox Jew in the traditional black garb and black hat, but what was unusual was that he was exhibiting photographs on the steps of a brownstone, selling prints to passersby.

I was drawn to the image of the French girl hanging clothes out the window. It was the sort of black and white “street photography ” that I prefer — very much like the work of so many great European artists. His prints were sophisticated and beautifully done and they didn’t seem to fit with his persona, especially the part where he was selling his work on somebody’s stoop. I only now found out that he was a pro and that he died in 2000.

I bought two photographs from him that day. They were inexpensive, perhaps $10.00. I still treasure the image of the girl from Nice — because it is wonderful but also because of how I acquired it.  — Paul Goldfinger    (note: click left for a larger view)

ADDENDUM: The above article is reposted from January, 2013, but now  (below) we show the second Chaim Kanner photograph which I have. It, like the other one, is a silver gelatin print which he made himself.  It is a gorgeous urban landscape which I love,  taken in Paris of the River Seine at the Pont Neuf.

Although the subject is rather trite, that is irrelevant because his result is so beautiful.    The strikingly clear lighting, the composition, and then the print itself make this version special.   I photographed the same scene when I went there, but his is so much better.  I can’t believe I bought this on a mid-town stoop.

The name Chaim is of Hebrew origin and means “life,” Just like the toast “L’chaim” means “to life.”  You may recall the song from Fiddler on the Roof.  My grandfather’s name was Chaim, but the anglicized version was “Hyman.”  Looking back on it, I wonder which one he preferred. I called him by his third name—“Grandpa.”  In fact, I wanted to name our oldest son after him, but Eileen objected to having a son named “Grandpa.”

Eugene Atget, a French photographer, became famous photographing old Paris.  Here is a link to our 2013 post about Atget including an example of my own work trying to emulate the master:   Blogfinger on Atget

Paris, 1980. By Chaim Kanner. ©

Paris, 1980. By Chaim Kanner. ©

 

SIDNEY BECHET.  The music video is from Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris.”

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Ocean Grove PIer. By Bob Bowne

Ocean Grove Pier. By Bob Bowné.  October 29, 2013

By Paul Goldfinger, Editor @Blogfinger.  Reposted from 2013.

On October 29, 2012, when Super Storm Sandy hit Ocean Grove, Bob Bowné  climbed to the top of the Windamer Hotel and went out on a small balcony at the left side.  The wind was ferocious, but he managed to remain there while he gathered his photo gear.  Bob is a professional photographer, so when he saw the furor of the ocean and the beginning of flooding, he knew that he had to document this huge event.

The Windamer Hotel on Ocean Avenue facing the pier, in Ocean Grove near Embury Ave. Bob was on a small balcony--upper left. Blogfinger photo.

The Windamer Hotel on Ocean Avenue facing the pier, in Ocean Grove near Embury Ave. 10/29/12.  Bob was on a small balcony–upper left.   Photo by Paul Goldfinger @Blogfinger.net   ©

It was about 4:00 p.m., and the peak of the storm had not yet hit, but the sight of that tumultous ocean was awesome.  That is when he obtained the photograph that would become an iconic image of the storm. He said that he preferred making the image while the pier was intact, so that it would document what was, rather than what would be after.

The full strength of Sandy came to bear at about 9:00 pm. after the winds shifted and roared in from the south.    Bob was the only person in his building and he watched as the devastation evolved including the loss of most of the fishing pier and the boardwalk.    He went downstairs to check his apartment which was in the basement and he came face to face with a large piece of the Hotel’s roof. Water was pouring in over the boardwalk area and onto Ocean Avenue, heading west.

Sandy: Ocean Avenue. By Bob Bowné

Sandy: Ocean Avenue. By Bob Bowné. ©  Special to Blogfinger.

Bob Bowné is a life long Grover and he currently works as a carpenter.  In the past he was a commercial photographer who specialized in product imagery. He also was a surfer for many years and he used to photograph for surfing publications.

Ocean Avenue. by Bob Bowné

Ocean Avenue. by Bob Bowné. ©  Special to Blogfinger.

In preparation for a major exhibit about the storm at the Museum of the City of New York, 10,000 photographs were evaluated.  Bob’s spectacular shot of the ocean boiling over the OG pier was judged one of the most dramatic images.

The pier picture is the only one of his in the exhibit, but he has allowed us to publish a few more from that storm day. These gorgeous images are now exhibited  publicly for the first time.   Bob said that the light was unusual and transient, enabling him to obtain the photographs that we are now showing, without any software manipulation.

Opening of "Rising Waters: Photographs of Sandy. Bob used a fisheye lens for this shot.

Opening of “Rising Waters: Photographs of Sandy.” Bob used a fisheye lens for this shot.

The exhibit opened on October 29, 2013.  Bob was there, and people asked for him to sign his photo.  The  exhibit is called “Rising Waters: Photographs of Sandy”

Bob Bowne, Photographer. Ocean Grove Pier (October 30, 2013. By Paul Goldfinger @Blogfinger ©

Bob Bowné, Photographer. Ocean Grove Pier, October 30, 2013,  © Photo by Paul Goldfinger  @Blogfinger.net   © One year and a day after Sandy.

 

For anyone interested in purchasing one of Bob’s Sandy prints, here is his email:    bownephoto@optimum.net

BOB DYLAN  “Blowin’ in the Wind”

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Ocean Grove, NJ. undated. By Rich Despins  ©

Ocean Grove, NJ. undated. By Rich Despins ©   click to make it larger.

ARTIE SHAW:

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Lucile Brokaw, Harper's Bazaar, 1933. By Martin Munkacsi  ©

Lucile Brokaw, Harper’s Bazaar, 1933. By Martin Munkacsi ©

Martin Munkasci (1896-1963) was born in Romania and had a successful career as a photojournalist in Hungary and Germany. He was Jewish and he got out of town in the 1930’s.

He was snapped up by Harper’s Bazaar, a leading New York fashion magazine. He was successful photographing celebrities. His work influenced Cartier-Bresson, and Richard Avedon said about Munkasci, “He brought a taste for happiness and honesty and a love of women to what was, before him, a joyless, loveless, lying art. Today the world of what is called fashion is peopled with Munkácsi’s babies, his heirs…. The art of Munkácsi lay in what he wanted life to be, and he wanted it to be splendid. And it was.”

For some reason, many immigrant photographers came to the US from Hungary including André Kertesz and Robert and Cornell Capa.

Lucille Brokaw was a model, actress and socialite. This is a famous photograph which Munkacsi shot on a beach in Long Island.

JULIA ROBERTS   (from  the Woody Allen film “Everyone Says I Love You.”)

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