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Archive for the ‘Music from the movies’ Category

Wesley Lake is almost frozen solid this morning, Wednesday, Jan 28, 2015. By Bob Bowné, special to Blogfinger. © Wesley Lake is almost frozen solid this morning, Wednesday, Jan 28, 2015. By Bob Bowné, special to Blogfinger. ©. Asbury Park, N.J.

 

 

SHERRILL MILNES.  “Bella figlia deli’amoré”   (Verdi’s  Rigoletto)  From the soundtrack of the film “Quartet”

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Blvd St Michel By Paul Goldfinger

Place Saint-Michel, Paris Left Bank.   By Paul Goldfinger©

 

DJANGO REINHARDT   from the movie Something’s Gotta Give:  “Brazil”

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Florence. Italy. By Paul Goldfinger ©

The Three Graces.    Florence. Italy.  Photo and silver gelatin darkroom print by Paul Goldfinger ©

 

ELVIS  COSTELLO.   From the movie Notting Hill.   The song is “She” written by Charles Aznavour, the French singer composer.

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Ocean Grove, New Jersey. By Ted Aanensen, Blogfinger staff photographer. August, 2013.

Ocean Grove, New Jersey. By Ted Aanensen, Blogfinger staff photographer. August, 2013.  Click  for more parking spaces.

 

THEME FROM A BRIDGE TOO FAR.  By the Band of the H.M. Royal Marines

 

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W. Eugene Smith from the book "the Family of Man."

W. Eugene Smith from the book “the Family of Man.”

 

By Paul Goldfinger, Photography Editor at Blogfnger.net      Re-post by popular request.

 

In 1955, a photography exhibit was mounted at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.  It was curated by Edward Steichen, the Director of Photography at MOMA and a famous photographer in his own right.   The Family of Man was the largest and most popular photographic exhibit in history. Steichen requested and received 2 million images from photographers all over the world.  Eventually he chose 503 photos by 273 photographers (168 Americans) from 68 countries.

By the time the exhibit ended, it had been seen by over 250,000 people. It then went on a world tour, and by the time that ended in 1961, it had been viewed by 9 million people.  The theme of the exhibit, according to Steichen, was to “prove visually the universality of human experience and photography’s role in its documentation.”

“Among the themes that were covered were birth, love, joy, war, privation, illness and death.” (Wikipedia) images

Steichen published a book from the exhibit, and over 4 million copies have been sold (I have two of them.)

The image on the last page of the book showed two small children walking hand in hand through a canopy of trees.  It was shot from the rear and was taken by the famous American photographer W. Eugene Smith. There was a quotation with the photograph which said, “..a world to be born under your footsteps.”   That quote was by the French poet Saint-John Perse (1887-1975) who won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1960.

W. Eugene Smith (1918-1978) was a photojournalist from Kansas who was famous for covering the brutal war  (WWII) in the Pacific.   Some years later he became better known for his photo essay about the fetal damage and deaths related to mercury contaminated water by local industry  in the town of Minamata, Japan. For his award winning work, he was badly beaten by corporate goons.

"Migrant Mother" from the exhibit. by Dorothea Lange, 1936

“Migrant Mother” from the exhibit. by Dorothea Lange, 1936

 

From the Minamata exhibit by W. Eugene Smith.

From the Minamata exhibit by W. Eugene Smith.

SOUNDTRACK:   Andrei’s Theme by Armand Amar.  From the film  “The Concert.”

 

Addendum:     Not to compare myself to Smith, but one of my photographs reminds me of those two kids walking in the woods. All artists are influenced by those who preceded them.  That image is below—PG

 

Central Park. Paul Goldfinger photo. ©

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Fertility god. A replica from a Hindu temple in central Java before the Islamic era. Photographed at the Naples Botanical Gardens by Eileen Goldfinger

Fertility god. A replica from a Hindu temple in central Java before the Islamic era. Photographed at the Naples Botanical  Garden  by Eileen Goldfinger. ©

YUNA —— from the soundtrack to the film Savages

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Washington Square Park, 2013. By Paul Goldfinger © left click for details

Washington Square Park, 2013. By Paul Goldfinger © Click for details.

 

ALICIA MORTON AND VICTOR GARBER.  from Annie–

 

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Quote of the day, “Take your filthy paws off my silky drawers.”

Stockard Channing from Grease.

Stockard Channing from Grease.

Unknown

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By Paul Goldfinger. Untitled. 2015. © By Paul Goldfinger. Untitled. 2015. ©

 

 

PEGGY LEE.

 

This song, written by Hoagy Carmichael in 1939, was performed in the 1952 film Las Vegas Story by Carmichael and Jane Russell (va-va-voom!)

 

 

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Swordfish. Wegmans fish department, Ocean Store. May 18, 2013. Paul Goldfinger photo. Left click for full view

Swordfish. Wegmans’ fish department, Ocean Store. May 18, 2013. Paul Goldfinger photo.  Click photo  for full view

 

By Paul Goldfinger,  Editor Blogfinger.net

 

When I go fishing, I go to Wegmans because you can definitely catch a fish there. As the hunter in the family, the modern-day version of the cave man, you have to confront danger in the Wegmans parking lot and then finesse your way around all the other game hunters in the store, the most crafty being the young multi-tasking moms racing around pushing little kids driving basket trucks.

Then I bring home the game: fish or chicken or whatever. As a kid, sometimes I would complain to my mother that she should cook something different, and she would say, “Sure, as soon as they invent a new animal.”

Swordfish skeleton from the National Museum of Natural History. Internet photo

Swordfish skeleton from the National Museum of Natural History. Internet photo

 

Anyhow, I turn over my fish to the gatherer in our house—Eileen, who fires up the stove and cooks it like the gatherers of old.

Do you think the cavemen ate sushi? They probably did before they invented fire. I should listen again to Mel Brooks and Carl Reiner’s record of the Two Thousand Year Old Man to find out. Today those guys are probably eating bagels and lox at the Carnegie Deli or Russ and Daughters in New York City.

Hemingway with a marlin that he caught off Cuba. Marlin can weigh 500 pounds and are related to the swordfish.

Hemingway with a marlin that he caught off Cuba. Marlin can weigh 500 pounds and are related to the swordfish.

The catch of the day today at Wegmans is swordfish. Xiphias glades is a powerful and fast fish which has no teeth. But it has a sword to slash its prey. They gave me a sword in the Navy, but I didn’t dare take it out of its sheath. It’s currently in my Ocean Grove bedroom in case a Barbary pirate invades my house.

I took a photo of the swordfish before the Wegmans’ chefs dismantle it for barbecue steaks this weekend.

Did I buy swordfish? No, I chose cod loins so that Eileen can make some sort of French/Italian heart-healthy dish that she does so well over our campfire in the Blogcave in Ocean Grove. Then, if I can persuade her, we can jump into the Blogmobile and go for Days’ ice cream, something the cave men sadly never experienced.

—-Paul Goldfinger, Editor

 

Fred Mollin and the Blue Sea Band from the Disney film Ratatouille

 

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