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Archive for the ‘Ocean Grove lifestyles’ Category

Ocean Grove by Jean Bredin © Blogfinger staff. June, 2017.

Jean around town:      “Ocean Grovers are inventive people.  Driving through Delaware Ave, I spotted a good example. If you have a small side yard, cut your umbrella in half and be done with it.”

JOHN DENVER:

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Back then the CMA controlled all parking in the Grove.  If that parking mandate was not outrageous,  then why not  the new paradigm?

 

Parking in the Grove. Resident parking should come first. Everyone else can find a way. Blogfinger photograph. 2015.

By Paul Goldfinger,  Editor @Blogfnger.net

Until 1980, the Camp Meeting Association ran the town and could command everyone to move their cars out of town on Sunday.  But they are no longer in charge, and Ocean Grove is now similar to other Shore towns when it comes to parking, except that we have few garages and driveways.

There are a finite number of parking spaces in the Grove and a finite number of residents.

Those people who live in this town and who pay to live here—owners and renters—-should receive a special status which gives them top priority for parking spaces.

The Township should  promise that residents will be guaranteed a parking space whenever they need one.  This can be done by allocating special reserved spaces for them.   All others who come into town including tourists, shoppers, church-goers,  and beachers will have to compete for the remaining spaces.

Where is it written that parking is a democratic process?  Favoritism for residents is essential to maintain life styles and functionality for those who make this town their home.  They deserve that privilege, and everyone else is on their own.

Many ideas can be implemented to help those non-residents who want to visit here, and those ideas involve reducing the number of visitors with cars and adding order with metered parking.

Yes there would be some wrinkles to iron out, but this favoritism offers a foundation for solving the problem and a chance to reclaim the town for the home-boys and girls who favor a comfortable, family style, non-congested, historical, small town atmosphere with air, light,  space, and parking.

Petition the town, wave a magic wand, and voila—our home values will go up and our town will be better.

BILLY JOEL ROYAL:

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Giant truck Main Avenue near OceanAve. Ocean Grove, June, 2017. By Rich Amole, Blogfinger staff. ©

Soon the Township will try to squeeze a few more diagonal  parking spaces into the residential  part of Main Avenue near Firemen’s Park all the way to the “gates.”    That will be ugly and risky and will not help the residents of Ocean Grove with their intermittently disabling  parking issues.  We all have tried to enter Main Avenue from one of those side streets located where diagonal parking already exists  (such as New Jersey Avenue at Main.)  It is discouraging, dangerous, scary and difficult because oftentimes the driver cannot see what is coming as he plans to enter Main Ave.

But also, as Rich Amole points out in the photo above, huge cars/trucks  often occupy those diagonal spaces, and that can cause a problem as a car driving on Main has to go around that big vehicle.

Rich says:

“Hi Paul:     Accident waiting to happen?
“Vehicle turning off of Ocean Ave onto Main  Ave. certainly does not expect that a vehicle heading to Ocean Ave. has to swerve into that other lane to avoid hitting the truck.    I  happened to be in the Grove last Saturday and did have to pass into the other lane with caution.”

These are examples of how desperate attempts to add parking spaces in a futile effort to provide for the growing number of cars in the Grove all season long and beyond in both directions can create more chances for accidents.  We need to have less cars in this small town–not more.   People, including children actually live here; let’s improve the safety profile for them.

Cancel the plans for more diagonal parking and then let’s do some real creative thinking to help the residents.

—Paul Goldfinger, Editor.

CAST OF LA LA LAND     “Another Day of Sun.”

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Greenleaf Park: Mt. Tabor, New York and Mt. Carmel Avenues. Paul Goldfinger photo. Blogfinger.net©   2017.    Click to enlarge.

THE BEATLES

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Flying high on the new Ocean Grove Boardwalk. (or checking his diaper.)  Paul Goldfinger photo © June 2014.      Click to enlarge

NANCY LAMOTT

 

 

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Memorial Day weekend in the Grove. May 28, 2017. Paul Goldfinger photo. © Click for a closer view.

 

“It’s Easy to Remember (and so Hard to Forget).”   This song is from a 1935 movie Mississippi by Richard Rodgers (music) and Lorenz Hart (lyrics.)

“Your sweet expression
The smile you gave me
The way you looked when we met
It’s easy to remember
But so hard to forget

“I hear you whisper
‘I’ll always love you’
I know it’s over and yet
It’s easy to remember
But so hard to forget

“So I must dream
To have your hand caress me
Fingers, press me tight
I’d rather dream
Than have that lonely feeling
Stealing through the night

“Each little moment
Is clear before me
And though it brings me regret
It’s easy to remember
And so hard to forget…”

 

JOHN COLTRANE   (instrumental)

 

 

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Ivory of Ocean Grove is a member of a designer breed “Goldendoodle.”   (Golden Retriever and a Standard Poodle) Paul Goldfinger photo 5/29/17 at the Memorial Day parade heading east on Main.

 

In front of Firemen’s Park. The Memorial Day Parade, consisting of a band, some veterans, and a long procession of official vehicles sufficient for a small invasion, was a fascinating sight for the kids along the way.  Paul Goldfinger  photo 5/29/17 ©

 

Procession of vehicles. Blogfinger photo.

 

Remember this—two years ago. Caylee (L) and Mom Rachel. Firemen’s Park. May 25, 2015. Paul Goldfinger photo. © Click to enlarge

Next year science may deliver a humandoodle. Sort of a combination of a person who is curious, frisky and wants to talk and a poodle which is friendly and likes to smell things and eat doggy treats.

You can train this breed to take its own poop bag to the park where it will use it, tie it, and toss it out.  Since the Goldendoodle is part French, it will enjoy a hamburger served on a brioche washed down with a little red wine and then a Gauloises cigarette on the porch.

THE BLUE VIPERS OF BROOKLYN:

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Christmas Eve, Firemen’s Park, Ocean Grove, 2015.  Paul Goldfinger photograph. ©

TAYLOR SWIFT:

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Nagles Saturday Night. Main Avenue.  August 2012. Paul Goldfinger photograph ©  Click to enlarge.

 

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“Low Tide at Wesley Lake”  Blogfinger photo.©

Water  near the retaining wall by Founders’ Park in OG. Blogfinger  (Stephen Goldfinger)  photo. 12/7/16 © Click it and then take a deep breath. Is it any wonder that not a single bird was in sight?

Wesley Lake, west end. March 28, 2017. Paul Goldfinger photo © Click to enlarge. Photograph from the muckrakers at Blogfinger–Paul Goldfinger.© March, 2017.

By Jack Bredin, researcher and reporter for Blogfinger.net  and Paul Goldfinger, Editor@Blogfinger.net

Blogfinger has posted a variety of articles about Wesley Lake pollution. Today we feature yet another piece on that subject which contains some new elements which we have not addressed before.

Q:  The Lenape Indians used Wesley Lake as a source of food.  Now the Lake is reserved for recreation and conservation—-or is it?

A:  According to the Neptune township Tax Map (effective Jan. 1, 2015) Wesley Lake is now a municipal facility to be used to treat dirty street-water runoff. The Lake’s name has been changed to ” Wesley Detention/Retention  Basin” under the supervision of the Departments of Public Works.

Q: Who is responsible for this?

A:  It starts with the Neptune Township Committee along with the Mayor and Council of Asbury Park.   The  two governing bodies are in  charge, so  the buck stops with them, or in this case, the pollution starts and stops with them.    Officials from both towns took an oath  that would include managing the welfare of the Lake for recreational use.  It should be noted that most of the dirty street-water runoff comes from AP.

Q: How did this happen?

A:  It happened when the mayors of both Neptune and AP took their charters and hung them on the developers’ walls.

Q:  Who can correct this plethora of problems involving the Lake’s rehabilitation and restoration?

A: The Wesley Lake Commission. Or can they?  Jack attended a meeting of the Commission on May 16, 2017, and suggested that they should not allow street-water runoff to enter the Lake because that is causing the Lake to be polluted. And the streets are not part of the Lake’s natural watershed.

Discussion:

A member of the Wesley Lake Commission representing Neptune’s DPW  (Dept. of Public Works) said, “The streets are in the ‘watershed area,’  and in New Jersey you are permitted by the Dept. of Environmental Protection to allow street water runoff to drain into a lake.”

But the “watershed area” includes all the land that drains into the lake, and by that definition, it does includes street run-off.  But there is a semantic issue here.  He would be correct if the streets were a part of the Lake’s “natural watershed” and not just “in the watershed area.”    The”natural water-shed area”  is desirable, but dirty street water is not part of that.

So his argument boils down to “let’s keep polluting the Lake illegally.”

You might have noticed the Rainwater Garden near the train station in Asbury Park.  That is an example of a desirable “natural” water-shed area where the rain is purified by the soil and plantings and then the clean water drains into the lake.

And if the name change from Wesley Lake to “Wesley Detention/Retention Basin” had been done legally by Resolution of the Neptune Committee with permission from the New Jersey DEP Green Acres Program,  then the streets would become “the watershed” for a detention/retention basin, but there was no such Resolution or Green Acres permission.  Note that a detention/retention basin is an actual structural facility to clean the water draining into the Lake. So far all we have is a name change on the Neptune Tax Map.  We don’t even have a map that shows the Lake’s water-shed. And we don’t know where A. Park stands on this, but we can guess.

So what’s in a name?–in this case, nothing.

Another member of the Commission said, “The condition of Wesley Lake is the same now as it has been for the last 10,000 years, and the condition of the Lake’s mud is a naturally occurring condition found in every lake.”

We think the dead fish never got the professor’s message.  And, we have to remind the professor, that 10,000 years ago they were first brewing beer in Mesopotamia, but there are no records of what Wesley Lake looked like then.  We barely know about it from records of 1869. We do know that it was much different than it is now—then it was a full blown estuary.

And don’t forget, the water may look or test clear sometimes, but what toxins are trapped in the mud? They don’t test the mud, only the water, and how often do they test the water?

We may be at a crossroads, but we still have the choice of which road to take, before it is too late:

1. “The road to recovery:”  Stopping the dirty street water from entering the Lake would be the first step in the Lake’s road to recovery
2. “The road to “Condo-City:”  This road would be a fantasy by certain factions in Ocean Grove who might see the Lake as a dead-end street where the polluted silt (ie mud)  builds up to a point where dredging and disposing of all that polluted mud becomes economically unfeasible.
And that leads to a scripted conclusion that it would be more cost effective to “cap” the mud, fill in the Lake, and build some modern, up-to-date condominiums.  It could happen!

LEANN RIMES:

 

 

 

 

 

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