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Archive for the ‘Photography Gallery France’ Category

St. Remy, France. By Paul Goldfinger ©

St. Remy, France. Silver gelatin darkroom print.  By Paul Goldfinger ©  Click on the image to enlarge this chateau.   Blogfinger.net

 

EVA CASSIDY:   “It Doesn’t Matter Anymore” from her album Imagine.

 

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Somewhere in Paris a French chef speaks to Eileen. She is speechless. Paul Goldfinger photo ©

Somewhere in Paris, on a rainy afternoon, a French chef speaks to Eileen. She is speechless. Paul Goldfinger photo ©  Re-post 2017.

MICHAEL GIACCHINO,  composer of the “Main Theme” from the film Ratatouille

 

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Luxembourg Gardens, Paris, left bank. Built by Marie de´Medici, widow of King Henry IV of France. Photo and silver gelatin print by Paul Goldfinger ©  Photo c.1995.   Don’t know the month of the photograph, but can tell you the century. (20th)  Click image to enlarge.

 

By Paul Goldfinger, Editor @Blogfinger.

It’s April in Paris, right now.  And it is a fine time to visit that most romantic of cities, but sometimes April there can dip down to the 40’s—sound familiar?  And, despite Yip Harburg’s lyrics, chestnuts in blossom don’t happen till May, and nobody is setting “holiday tables under the trees.”  In Luxembourg Gardens, blooms are starting to pop in April, and they have a bandstand there. However, choose May.

“I never knew the charm of spring
I never met it face to face
I never new my heart could sing
I never missed a warm embrace

Till April in Paris..
“Whom can I run to
What have you done to my heart”

This song, “April in Paris” was written by Yip Harburg and Vernon Duke for a 1932 Broadway show called, “Walk a Little Faster.”  Harburg also wrote the lyrics for “Somewhere Over the Rainbow.”  So many have recorded “April in Paris,” but Count Basie made the most famous version.

 

ELLA FITZGERALD WITH THE COUNT BASIE ORCHESTRA:

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Paris. Hand colored silver gelatin print by Eileen Goldfinger. ©

 

EMMY ROSSUM:     From her album Sentimental Journey

 

 

 

 

 

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Paris. Paul Goldfinger ©. Silver gelatin darkroom print. Undated.

PALAST ORCHESTER:

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Aphrodite, the Greek goddess, at the Louvre in Paris. Sculpted 100 BC. Paul Goldfinger ©.

 

ALBERTO QUINTERO AND KRISTIN CHENOWITH  (From The Phantom of the Opera)

 

 

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Outside courtyard at the Musée D’Orsay in Paris. Nothing new under the sun.  Paul Goldfinger ©. Tri-X collection.  Click on image to enlarge.

The Musée D’Orsay is an art museum on the Left Bank in Paris. It has a large collection of Impressionistic and Post-Impressionistic masterpieces.

Those bare breasted women in the image above, probably early 20th century beauties, are relaxing in the Paris sunshine, proudly displaying their loveliness.   And the other three women,  the warm blooded variety of today, are enjoying their company without evident embarrassment.

The photograph above shows that nothing changes—that everything old is new again.

PETER ALLEN

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Paul Goldfinger ©     Pont du Gard in southern France. Click to enlarge. Tri-X collection.

 

Roman engineers designed this 3 tier aqueduct in the first century to provide water to the Roman colony of Nimes.  It was used for centuries, but now it is mainly a tourist attraction. We posted a closeup of its structure on Blogfinger .  The link is below.

Closeup Pont de Gard

After the Roman slaves finished building the aqueduct, they had a big party, and the band played this song with Annie Siegel:

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Chaim

 

By Paul Goldfinger, Editor @Blogfinger.  Click on the images to make them bigger.

Chaim Kanner (1943-2000) was born in Nice. He studied in Europe and photographed in France and Italy. In 1967 he spent a year photographing in the US and Mexico. He worked as a professional photographer, first in the commercial field and then later in the fine art realm. He moved to the US in 1981.

I met him only once. It was in the 1980’s in mid-town Manhattan. He was a strange sight: an orthodox Jew in the traditional black garb and black hat, but what was unusual was that he was exhibiting photographs on the steps of a brownstone, selling prints to passersby.

I was drawn to the image of the French girl hanging clothes out the window. It was the sort of black and white “street photography ” that I prefer — very much like the work of so many great European artists. His prints were sophisticated and beautifully done and they didn’t seem to fit with his persona, especially the part where he was selling his work on somebody’s stoop. I only now found out that he was a pro and that he died in 2000.

I bought two photographs from him that day. They were inexpensive, perhaps $10.00. I still treasure the image of the girl from Nice — because it is wonderful but also because of how I acquired it.  — Paul Goldfinger    (note: click left for a larger view)

ADDENDUM: The above article is reposted from January, 2013, but now  (below) we show the second Chaim Kanner photograph which I have. It, like the other one, is a silver gelatin print which he made himself.  It is a gorgeous urban landscape which I love,  taken in Paris of the River Seine at the Pont Neuf.

Although the subject is rather trite, that is irrelevant because his result is so beautiful.    The strikingly clear lighting, the composition, and then the print itself make this version special.   I photographed the same scene when I went there, but his is so much better.  I can’t believe I bought this on a mid-town stoop.

The name Chaim is of Hebrew origin and means “life,” Just like the toast “L’chaim” means “to life.”  You may recall the song from Fiddler on the Roof.  My grandfather’s name was Chaim, but the anglicized version was “Hyman.”  Looking back on it, I wonder which one he preferred. I called him by his third name—“Grandpa.”  In fact, I wanted to name our oldest son after him, but Eileen objected to having a son named “Grandpa.”

Eugene Atget, a French photographer, became famous photographing old Paris.  Here is a link to our 2013 post about Atget including an example of my own work trying to emulate the master:   Blogfinger on Atget

Paris, 1980. By Chaim Kanner. ©

Paris, 1980. By Chaim Kanner. ©

 

SIDNEY BECHET.  The music video is from Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris.”

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Paul Goldfinger ©.  Place de Vosges  (1605).  Marais District of Paris. Click image to enlarge.

 

FRANCOIS PARISI:  “Le Parc de Plaisir” from Woody Allen’s film Midnight in Paris.

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