Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘fish oils’

By Eileen Goldfinger  (food editor at Blogfinger)

4 cups fish broth
1 cup water
6 ounces halibut, cut in 2 inch pieces
4 extra large sea scallops
7 ounces cooked lobster meat
1/2   32 ounce can San Marzano whole tomatoes, hand crushed
1 sweet onion, diced
1 Anaheim pepper, seeded, diced
4 cloves garlic, chopped
1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
pinch of sea salt or kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
10 large leaves of Swiss chard,  remove center stem, slice leaves in 1/2 inch strips
6 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

Use a heavy 5 quart Dutch oven with a lid.  Heat oil on medium heat, then add diced onions. Cook onions until they begin to soften, approximately 10 minutes.  Add the Anaheim peppers, red pepper flakes, salt and pepper;  stir and cook for another 10 minutes.  Lower the heat to medium-low, add the garlic and cook for another 3 minutes.  Add the crushed tomatoes, return the heat to medium and cook for an additional 10 minutes

Remove fish from refrigerator and allow it to reach room temperature.

Add the broth, water and Swiss chard to the pot, stir, bring to a boil, cover the pot, lower heat so the liquid simmers and cook for 45 minutes.

Taste the soup and adjust seasoning.

Add halibut to soup and cook for 5 minutes.  Next add scallops to soup and cook for 7 minutes.  Finally, add lobster and cook for 2 minutes.

Serve with grilled Ciabatta bread and sautéed slices of polenta.

Serves 2

Cook’s note: A more economical version could substitute any solid white fish such as cod loin for the halibut. The lobster could be replaced with shrimp.  A good wine with this is Cavit’s Pinot Grigio  (from Italy) served chilled. It is inexpensive and quite delicious.

Editor’s note:  This recipe is 100% heart healthy. Fish is a nutritious protein source which contains no saturated fat and very low amounts of total fat. Lobster and scallops are shellfish which contain only small amounts of cholesterol.  All these fish components are heart healthy due to their fish oils. Note that the cooking oil chosen is olive oil, which is a “good oil” high in monounsaturated fat.  Swiss chard is high in anti-oxidants, vitamins and minerals.    This recipe originally posted on Blogfinger in 2011.  PG

MUSIC: To play while you enjoy your Italian Fish Soup by candlelight :  Puccini, from La Boheme, “Musetta’s Waltz”–Kiri Te Kanawa:

Read Full Post »

PG photo

 

Clam Chowder with Red Potatoes  by Eileen Goldfinger, Food Editor @Blogfinger

8 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

2 tablespoons fresh parsley, minced

1 medium onion, diced

8 small red potatoes, quartered and parboiled

4 cloves garlic, minced

½ ancho pepper, seeded and minced

9 San Marzano canned whole plum tomatoes, diced

¼ cup marinara sauce

2 medium carrots, peeled and diced

1 celery stalk, thinly sliced

2  6 ½ ounce cans chopped clams, drained

2 dozen littleneck clams in their shell

2½  cups chicken broth

¼ cup white wine

1 cup clam broth

½ cup water

freshly ground black pepper to taste.

Broth:

In a 5 quart stock pot, heat 4 tablespoons of olive oil on medium heat. Add onion, carrots, celery and ¼ cup of chicken broth; sauté until the vegetables begin to soften, approximately 15 minutes.  Lower the heat to low-medium, add garlic and ancho pepper, and sauté for 2 minutes. Add the tomatoes and marinara sauce; stir and cook for 10 minutes. Add 2 cups of chicken broth. Then add clam broth, water, wine, potatoes, black pepper, canned clams, and parsley to the broth. Stir contents of the pot. Place cover, slightly ajar on the pot.  Simmer liquid for 30 minutes, stir occasionally.

Littleneck clams:

After  the soup broth has simmered for 15 minutes, in a large fry pan, add the remaining olive oil, chicken broth and wine, and heat on medium.  When the liquid starts to simmer, add the little-neck clams to the pan and cook until all the clams have opened.  As the clams open, remove them from the pan and set them aside. Discard any clams that do not open after 15 minutes.

Set out two large soup bowls and place a dozen clams in each one. Ladle broth over the clams.

Serves 2

 

prevention-does-work

Editor’s Note:  This recipe is adapted from Eileen’s “Seafood Chowder with Red Potatoes” found in “Prevention Does Work: A Guide to a Healthy Heart.” by Paul Goldfinger MD and Eileen Goldfinger, BA.

Our book is still relevant for those who want to learn some heart-healthy recipes—originals by Eileen, with an emphasis on seafood.    It is still available as a paper back from Amazon.  Just type in Paul Goldfinger MD. It is $12.95 in paperback.

We also have posted Eileen’s other clam chowder recipe called Eileen’s Greatest NJ Clam Chowder.

 

Eileen’s Greatest New Jersey Clam Chowder 2018

 

PEETIE WHEATSTRAW:   “I Want Some Seafood, Mama.”

 

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: